I

Hello, you have come here looking for the meaning of the word I. In DICTIOUS you will not only get to know all the dictionary meanings for the word I, but we will also tell you about its etymology, its characteristics and you will know how to say I in singular and plural. Everything you need to know about the word I you have here. The definition of the word I will help you to be more precise and correct when speaking or writing your texts. Knowing the definition ofI, as well as those of other words, enriches your vocabulary and provides you with more and better linguistic resources.
LetterI.svg
I U+0049, I
LATIN CAPITAL LETTER I
H
Basic Latin J
U+2160.svg
U+2160, Ⅰ
ROMAN NUMERAL ONE

Number Forms
U+FF29, I
FULLWIDTH LATIN CAPITAL LETTER I

Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms

Translingual

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms

  • (Roman numeral one): , i,
  • ("Cardinal number read ordinal", i.e. ordinal): I.

Etymology

From the Etruscan letter 𐌉 (i, i), from the Ancient Greek letter Ι (I, iota), derived from the Phoenician letter 𐤉(y, yod), from the Egyptian hieroglyph 𓂝.

Letter

I (lower case i)

  1. The ninth letter of the basic modern Latin alphabet.

I (lower case ı)

  1. The letter i without a dot above, in both the upper case and the lower case versions.

See also

Symbol

I

  1. (chemistry) Symbol for iodine.
  2. (physics) Isotopic spin.
  3. (license plate codes) Italy
  4. (physics, electronics) Electrical current.
  5. (physics, kinematics) moment of inertia.
  6. (biochemistry) IUPAC 1-letter abbreviation for isoleucine
  7. (mathematics, linear algebra) identity matrix
  8. (mathematical analysis, topology) the (closed) unit interval;
  9. (inorganic chemistry) Specifying an oxidation state of 1
  10. (music) major tonic triad
  11. (linguistics) A wildcard for a front vowel or a high vowel
    synonyms: E for a front vowel, Ɨ for a high vowel
  12. (clothing) Bra cup size.

Numeral

I (upper case Roman numeral, lower case i)

  1. cardinal number one.
  2. (especially in the names of aristocracy) the first.

See also

Gallery

See also

Other representations of I:

References


English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English I (also ik, ich), from Old English ih (also ic, iċċ (I)), from Proto-West Germanic *ik, from Proto-Germanic *ik, *ek (I), from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂ (I).

Cognate with Scots I, ik, A (I), Saterland Frisian iek (I), West Frisian ik (I), Dutch ik (I), Low German ik (I), German ich (I), Bavarian i (I), Yiddish איך(ikh, I), Danish and Norwegian Bokmål jeg (I), Norwegian Nynorsk eg (I), Swedish jag (I), Icelandic ég, eg (I), Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik, I), and more remotely with Latin ego (I), Ancient Greek ἐγώ (egṓ, I), Russian я (ja, I), Lithuanian (I), Armenian ես (es, I), Sanskrit अहम् (ahám, I), Hittite 𒌑𒊌 (ūk, I). See also English ich. Doublet of ego and Ich.

Pronoun

I (first person singular subject personal pronoun, objective me, possessive my, possessive pronoun mine, reflexive myself)

  1. The speaker or writer, referred to as the grammatical subject, of a sentence.
  2. (nonstandard) The speaker or writer, referred to as the grammatical object, of a sentence.
    Mom drove my sister and I to school.
Usage notes
  • The word I is always capitalised in written English. Other forms of the pronoun, such as me and my, follow regular English capitalisation rules.
  • I is the subject (nominative) form, as opposed to me, which is the objective (accusative and dative) form. Me is also used emphatically, like French moi. In some cases there are differing views about which is preferred. For example, the traditional rule followed by some speakers is to use I as the complement of the copula (It is I), but it is now more usual to choose me in this context (It's me).
  • When used in lists, it is often thought better to refer to oneself last. Thus it is more natural to say John and I than I and John. In such lists, the traditional rule is to use the same case form one would choose if there were only one pronoun. Thus, since we say I am happy, we say John and I are happy, but since we say Jenny saw me, so we say Jenny saw John and me. However, one frequently hears John and me are happy, which is traditionally seen as a case error. Similarly, probably as a hypercorrected reaction to this, one can occasionally hear phrases like Jenny saw John and I.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations
See also

Noun

I (uncountable)

  1. (metaphysics) The ego.
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i, plural Is or I's)

  1. The ninth letter of the English alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.
Derived terms
See also

Number

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The ordinal number ninth, derived from this letter of the English alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.

Etymology 3

Abbreviation.

Noun

I (countable and uncountable, plural Is)

  1. (US, roadway) Interstate.
  2. (grammar) Abbreviation of instrumental case.
  3. (computing) Abbreviation of instruction.

Etymology 4

Interjection

I

  1. Obsolete spelling of aye.

References


Afar

Letter

I (lowercase i)

  1. The ninth letter of the Afar alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also


Afrikaans

Pronunciation

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The ninth letter of the Afrikaans alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also

Noun

I (plural I's, diminutive I'tjie)

  1. I

Angami

Letter

I

  1. The fifth letter of the Angami alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also


Azerbaijani

Letter

I upper case (lower case ı)

  1. The thirteenth letter of the Azerbaijani alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also


Basque

Pronunciation

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The ninth letter of the Basque alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.

See also


Cameroon Pidgin

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

Pronoun

I

  1. I, 1st person singular subject personal pronoun

See also


Chinese

Pronunciation 1


Note: The zero initial /∅-/ is commonly pronounced with a ng-initial /ŋ-/ in some varieties of Cantonese, including Hong Kong Cantonese.
Note: Often realised as one syllable.

Letter

I

  1. The ninth letter of the Latin alphabet.

Pronunciation 2

Letter

I

  1. The ninth letter used in Pinyin.

Usage notes

  • The pronunciation above are only used while referring to letters in Pinyin. They are not used in other context (such as English).

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse ír, variant of ér, from Proto-Germanic *jūz, from Proto-Indo-European *yū́.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

I (objective jer, possessive jeres)

  1. (personal) you, you all (second person plural)
    I må ikke gå derind!
    You can't go in there!
    • 2014, Diverse forfattere, Fire uger blev til fire år - og andre beretninger, Lindhardt og Ringhof →ISBN
      Og så er der forresten lidt mere med det samme: I må love os een ting. mor og far, I må ikke efterligne os unge! — For gør I det, ja, så kommer I til at se så morsomme ud. — I må ikke prøve på at løbe fra jeres alder, for det kan I alligevel ikke.
      And by the way, there's something else: You must promise us one thing, mum and dad, you may not imitate us young! — For if you do, you will look so funny. — you may not try to run way from your age, for you can't do that anyway.
    • 1981, Mogens Wolstrup, Vild hyben: danske forfattere skriver om jalousi
      Men det er ikke jeres skyld, siger Ditte. I er unge og kloge. I er grimme og fantastisk smukke. I har modet! I er på rette vej med jeres show. Jeg føler med jeres oprør, og måske derfor kunne jeg ikke klare mere. Jeres hud er glat, I er startet i tide.
      But it is not your fault, Ditte says. You are young and intelligent. You are ugly and amazingly beautiful. You have the courage! You are on the right path with your show. I feel with your rebellion, and perhaps for that reason, I couldn't take any more. Your skin is smooth, you started in time.
    • 2011, Per Ullidtz, Absalons Europa, BoD – Books on Demand →ISBN, page 229
      Og lidt senere ”I har hørt at det er sagt: øje for øje og tand for tand. Men jeg siger jer, at I må ikke sætte jer imod det onde; men dersom nogen giver dig et slag på din højre kind, da vend ham også den anden til! ...
      And a little later ”you have heard it said: an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth. But I say to you, you may not resist evil; but if anyone hits you on the right cheek, turn the other towards ! ...

See also

References


Dutch

Pronunciation

Letter

I (capital, lowercase i)

  1. The ninth letter of the Dutch alphabet.

See also

  • Previous letter: H
  • Next letter: J

Esperanto

Pronunciation

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The twelfth letter of the Esperanto alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.

See also


Estonian

Estonian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia et

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The ninth letter of the Estonian alphabet, called ii and written in the Latin script.

See also


Finnish

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The ninth letter of the Finnish alphabet, called ii and written in the Latin script.

See also

Noun

I

  1. Abbreviation of improbatur.

French

Pronunciation

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The ninth letter of the French alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also


German

Pronunciation

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The ninth letter of the German alphabet.

Related terms


Hungarian

Pronunciation

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The fifteenth letter of the Hungarian alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.

Declension

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative I I-k
accusative I-t I-ket
dative I-nek I-knek
instrumental I-vel I-kkel
causal-final I-ért I-kért
translative I-vé I-kké
terminative I-ig I-kig
essive-formal I-ként I-kként
essive-modal
inessive I-ben I-kben
superessive I-n I-ken
adessive I-nél I-knél
illative I-be I-kbe
sublative I-re I-kre
allative I-hez I-khez
elative I-ből I-kből
delative I-ről I-kről
ablative I-től I-ktől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
I-é I-ké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
I-éi I-kéi
Possessive forms of I
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. I-m I-im
2nd person sing. I-d I-id
3rd person sing. I-je I-i
1st person plural I-nk I-ink
2nd person plural I-tek I-itek
3rd person plural I-jük I-ik

See also


Ido

Letter

I (lower case i)

  1. The ninth letter of the Ido alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also


Indonesian

Pronunciation

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The ninth letter of the Indonesian alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also


Italian

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Pronunciation

  • (letter name) IPA(key): /ˈi/*
    • Rhymes: -i
    • Hyphenation: Ì
  • (phonemic realization) IPA(key): /i/
  • (phonemic realization when followed by a vowel in the same syllable) IPA(key): /j/

Letter

I f or m (invariable, upper case, lower case i)

  1. The ninth letter of the Italian alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.

See also


Japanese

Romanization

I

  1. Rōmaji transcription of

Latvian

Latvian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia lv

Etymology

Proposed in 1908 as part of the new Latvian spelling by the scientific commission headed by K. Mīlenbahs, which was accepted and began to be taught in schools in 1909. Prior to that, Latvian had been written in German Fraktur, and sporadically in Cyrillic.

Pronunciation

(file)

Letter

I

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The thirteenth letter of the Latvian alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.

See also


Malay

Malay Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ms

Pronunciation

Letter

I

  1. The ninth letter of the Malay alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also


Middle English

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old English , from Proto-West Germanic *ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. More at English I.

Capitalized since 13th century to mark it as a distinct word and prevent misreading.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

I (accusative me, genitive min, genitive determiner mi, min)

  1. I (first-person singular subject pronoun)
    • c. 1275, Judas (Roud 2964, Child Ballad 23, Trinity College MS. B.14.39)‎, folio 34, recto, lines 36-37; republished at Cambridge: Wren Digital Library (Trinity College), 29 May 2019:
      Stille þou be peter. Wel i þe icnowe. / þou wolt fur ſake me þrien . ar þe coc him crowe.
      "Quiet now, Peter. I know you well; / You'll forsake me three times when the cock crows."
    • c. 1395, John Wycliffe, John Purvey , transl., Bible (Wycliffite Bible (later version), MS Lich 10.)‎, published c. 1410, Joon 15:19, page 51v, column 1; republished as Wycliffe's translation of the New Testament, Lichfield: Bill Endres, 2010:
      If ȝe hadden be of þe woꝛld .· þe woꝛld ſchulde loue þat þing þat was his / but foꝛ ȝe ben not of þe woꝛld · but I chees ȝou fro þe woꝛld .· þerfoꝛ þe woꝛld hatiþ ȝou
      If you had been of the world, the world would love that which is its ; so the world hates you, because you aren't of the world. Instead I picked you from the world.

Descendants

  • English: I, ik (obsolete), ich (obsolete)
  • Scots: A, I, ik (rare)
  • Yola: Ich

See also

References


Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

Pronoun

I

  1. (dialect) I: a first-person singular personal pronoun
  2. (rare, archaic) ye: a second-person plural nominative pronoun


Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Latin I.

Letter

I (lower case i, definite singular I-en, indefinite plural I-ar, definite plural I-ane)

  1. The ninth letter of the Norwegian alphabet, called I and written in the Latin script.

Etymology 2

From Old Norse ek, from Proto-Norse ᛖᚲ (ek), from Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. The upper case spelling might be an orthographic influence from cognate English I, or as a means to differenciate from native preposition i (in).

Alternative forms

Pronoun

I (objective me, possessive min)

  1. (dialectal) alternative form of eg (first person singular pronoun)

Etymology 3

Possibly through Danish I. From Old Norse ér, ír, from Proto-Germanic *jūz, from Proto-Indo-European *yū́. Compare with de. The upper case spelling might be explained either by its use as an honorific, or with its plausible Danish origins.

Alternative forms

Pronoun

I (objective ær or ør or jærs, possessive ærs or ørs or jærs)

  1. (obsolete or dialectal, polite) you (second person singular)
Derived terms

References

  • “I” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • Torp, Alf (1919), “I”, in Nynorsk etymologisk ordbok, Kristiania: Aschehoug, page 240
  • Ivar Aasen (1850), “i”, in Ordbog over det norske Folkesprog, Oslo: Samlaget, published 2000

Anagrams


Nupe

Pronunciation

  • (phoneme): IPA(key): /i/, (after /n/ or /m/) /ĩ/

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The eleventh letter of the Nupe alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also


Polish

Pronunciation

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The twelfth letter of the Polish alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.

See also

Further reading

  • I in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • I in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The ninth letter of the Portuguese alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also


Romani

Pronunciation

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. (International Standard) The twelfth letter of the Romani alphabet, written in the Latin script.
  2. (Pan-Vlax) The thirteenth letter of the Romani alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also


Romanian

Pronunciation

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The eleventh letter of the Romanian alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.

Usage notes

  • Generally represents the phoneme /i/.
  • Before vowels, this letter usually takes on the sound of /j/
    ianuarie /ja.nuˈa.ri.e/
  • At the ends of words (except verb infinitives, and those ending in a consonant cluster ending in l or r), the letter palatalizes the previous syllable and is "whispered": /ʲ/
    băieți /bəˈjetsʲ/

See also


Saanich

Pronunciation

Letter

I

  1. The eleventh letter of the Saanich alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also


Scots

Etymology 1

From Old English , from Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

Pronoun

I (first person singular, emphatic I)

  1. I
Synonyms

See also

Etymology 2

Letter

I

  1. The ninth letter of the Scots alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also


Skolt Sami

Pronunciation

Letter

I (lower case i)

  1. The sixteenth letter of the Skolt Sami alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also


Slovene

Slovene Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sl

Etymology

From Gaj's Latin alphabet I, from Czech alphabet I, from Latin I, from the Etruscan letter 𐌉 (i, i), from the Ancient Greek letter Ι (I, iota), derived from the Phoenician letter 𐤉(y, yod), from the Egyptian hieroglyph 𓂝.

Pronunciation

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The tenth letter of the Slovene alphabet, written in the Latin script.
  2. The fifteenth letter of the Resian alphabet, written in the Latin script.
  3. The eleventh letter of the Natisone Valley dialect alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Noun

Ī m inan

  1. The name of the Latin script letter I / i.

Inflection

  • Overall more common
First masculine declension (soft o-stem, inanimate), fixed accent, -j- infix
nom. sing. I
gen. sing. I-ja
singular dual plural
nominative I I-ja I-ji
genitive I-ja I-jev I-jev
dative I-ju, I-ji I-jema I-jem
accusative I I-ja I-je
locative I-ju, I-ji I-jih I-jih
instrumental I-jem I-jema I-ji
(vocative) I I-ja I-ji


  • More common when with a definite adjective
Third masculine declension (no endings), fixed accent
nom. sing. I
gen. sing. I
singular dual plural
nominative I I I
genitive I I I
dative I I I
accusative I I I
locative I I I
instrumental I I I
(vocative) I I I


  • Dialectal, in common written language used till 19th century
First masculine declension (hard o-stem, inanimate), fixed accent, -j- infix
nom. sing. I
gen. sing. I-ja
singular dual plural
nominative I I-ja I-ji
genitive I-ja I-jov I-jov
dative I-ju, I-ji I-joma I-jom
accusative I I-ja I-je
locative I-ju, I-ji I-jih I-jih
instrumental I-jom I-joma I-ji
(vocative) I I-ja I-ji


Derived terms

See also

Further reading

  • I”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Somali

Pronunciation

  • (phoneme): IPA(key): /ɪ/, /i/
  • (letter name): IPA(key): /ʔɪ/

Letter

I upper case (lower case i)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Somali alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.

Usage notes

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Somali alphabet, which follows Arabic abjad order. It is preceded by E and followed by O.

See also


Spanish

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. the ninth letter of the Spanish alphabet

Adjective

I

  1. Abbreviation of ilustre.
    La I municipalidad de Valparaíso.

Swedish

Etymology 1

See the etymology at #Translingual.

Pronunciation

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The ninth letter of the Swedish alphabet.

Etymology 2

From Old Swedish ī, īr, from Old Norse ír, variant of ér, from Proto-Germanic *jīz, variant of *jūz, from Proto-Indo-European *yū́.

Alternative forms

Pronoun

I (personal pronoun)

  1. (archaic) you (second-person plural nominative)
Synonyms
References
  • Lindström, Fredrik (2010), “Svårt att gissa arslets grundform [Hard to guess the lemma of arslet]”, in Språktidningen (in Swedish), issue 5, retrieved 14 July 2020

Turkish

Pronunciation

Letter

I (upper case, lower case ı)

  1. The eleventh letter of the Turkish alphabet, called ı and written in the Latin script.

See also


Vietnamese

Pronunciation

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The twelfth letter of the Vietnamese alphabet, called i or i ngắn and written in the Latin script.

See also


Welsh

Pronunciation

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The thirteenth letter of the Welsh alphabet, called i or i dot and written in the Latin script. It is preceded by H and followed by J.

Mutation

  • I cannot mutate but, being a vowel, does take h-prothesis, for example with the word iwrch (roe deer):
Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
iwrch unchanged unchanged hiwrch
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

See also

Further reading

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), chapter I, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Yoruba

Pronunciation

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The tenth letter of the Yoruba alphabet, called í and written in the Latin script.

See also


Zulu

Letter

I (upper case, lower case i)

  1. The ninth letter of the Zulu alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also