all

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English

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms

  • al (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English all, from Old English eall (all, every, entire, whole, universal), from Proto-West Germanic *all, from Proto-Germanic *allaz (all, whole, every), of uncertain origin but perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *h₂el- (beyond, other). Cognate with West Frisian al (all), Dutch al (all), Scots a' (all), German all (all), Swedish all (all), Norwegian all (all), Icelandic allur (all), Welsh holl (all), Irish uile (all), Lithuanian aliái (all, each, every).

Dialectal sense “all gone” a calque of German alle.

Pronunciation

Determiner

In this picture, all of the red shapes are inside the yellow boundary.

all

  1. Every individual or anything of the given class, with no exceptions (the noun or noun phrase denoting the class must be plural or uncountable).
    All contestants must register at the scorer’s table.
    All flesh is originally grass.
    All my friends like classical music.
    • 1638, Democritus Junior , The Anatomy of Melancholy. , 5th edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed for Henry Cripps, OCLC 932915040, partition II, section 2, member 6, subsection iv, page 298:
      Beautie alone is a ſoveraigne remedy againſt feare,griefe,and all melancholy fits; a charm,as Peter de la Seine and many other writers affirme,a banquet it ſelfe;he gives inſtance in diſcontented Menelaus that was ſo often freed by Helenas faire face: and hTully, 3 Tusc. cites Epicurus as a chiefe patron of this Tenent.
    • 1892, Walter Besant, chapter III, in The Ivory Gate , New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, , OCLC 16832619:
      In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass. In this way all respectable burgesses, down to fifty years ago, spent their evenings.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path . It twisted and turned, and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn. And, back of the lawn, was a big, old-fashioned house, with piazzas stretching in front of it, and all blazing with lights.
    • 2019 March 6, Drachinifel, The Battle of Samar (Alternate History) - Bring on the Battleships!, archived from the original on 4 July 2022, retrieved 10 July 2022, 25:58 from the start:
      On the one hand, we had a scenario where, effectively, the American admiral just went "You know what, all the destroyers attack", at which point they mowed through the Japanese destroyers like a Grim Reaper through a harvest of very, very dead gorn, especially with the Brooklyns in support.
  2. Throughout the whole of (a stated period of time; generally used with units of a day or longer).
    The store is open all day and all night.
    (= through the whole of the day and the whole of the night.)
    I’ve been working on this all year.
    (= from the beginning of the year until now.)
  3. Only; alone; nothing but.
    He's all talk; he never puts his ideas into practice.
  4. (obsolete) Any.

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Pronoun

all

  1. Everything.
    Some gave all they had.
    She knows all and sees all.
    Those who think they know it all are annoying to those of us who do.
  2. Everyone.
    A good time was had by all.
    We all enjoyed the movie.
    • 2012 October 9, chapter 7, in Marge Thompson & Frankie M. Leisering, editors, In His Grip … a Walk Through Breast Cancer, WestBow Press, →ISBN, page 39:
      Hey all, just a quick note as I am trying to do 46 things at once and slow down a touch all at once…
  3. The only thing(s).
    All that was left was a small pile of ash.
  4. (chiefly Southern US, Midland US, Scotland, Northern Ireland, India) Used after who, what, where, how and similar words, either without changing their meaning, or indicating that one expects that they cover more than one element, e.g. that "who all attended" is more than one person. (Some dialects only allow this to follow some words and not others.)
    • 1904 October 10, Shea v. Nilima, Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, in 1905, Reports Containing the Cases Determined in All the Circuits from the Organization of the Courts, page 266:
      Q. Now, then, when you started to go to stake the claims, who all went along?
      A. I and Johan Peter Johansen, Otto Greiner, and Thorulf Kjelsberg.
    • 1998, Football's Best Short Stories (ed. Paul D. Staudohar), 107:
      "I mean, you could have called us—collect, o'course—jes' to let us know how-all it's a-goin'."
    • 2002, Richard Haddock, Arkalalah, iUniverse (→ISBN), page 73:
      "Where all did he go? What exactly was his job?" Gary shrugged and produced a weak laugh. "I reckon the Middle East. Ain't that where all the oil is?"
    • 2011, Moni Mohsin, Tender Hooks, Random House India (→ISBN):
      "Do you ever ask me what I want to see? Or ask me about where all I've gone, who all I've met, what all I've done? Never. Not for one second. And why? Because you don't give two hoops about me."

Translations

Adverb

all (not comparable)

  1. Wholly; entirely; completely; totally.
    She was sitting all alone. It suddenly went all quiet.
    • 1738, Charles Wesley, “And can it be that I should gain”, in John Wesley, editor, A Collection of Psalms and Hymns, Charlestown: Lewis Timothy, OCLC 909267115:
      'Tis mystery all: th'Immortal dies
    • 1930, Norman Lindsay, Redheap, Sydney: Ure Smith, published 1965, page 127:
      The parson, all unaware, dully pursued his calling, perched above the exquisite derision of their glances.
  2. Apiece; each.
    The score was 30 all when the rain delay started.
  3. (degree) So much.
    Don't want to go? All the better since I lost the tickets.
  4. (obsolete, poetic) Even; just.
    • 1579, Edmund Spenser, The Shepheardes Calender, London: Hugh Singleton, OCLC 932885060:
      All as his straying flock he fed.
    • 1715, John Gay, What D’ye Call It?, London: Bernard Lintott, OCLC 938412196:
      A damsel lay deploring / All on a rock reclined.
  5. A quotative particle, compare like.
    She was all, “Whatever.”

Synonyms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun

all (countable and uncountable, plural alls)

  1. (with a possessive pronoun) Everything that one is capable of.
    She gave her all, and collapsed at the finish line.
  2. (countable) The totality of one's possessions.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, volume (please specify |volume=I to VI), London: A Millar , OCLC 928184292:
      Folio Society 1973, pp. 37-8:
      she therefore ordered Jenny to pack up her alls and begone, for that she was determined she should not sleep that night within her walls. I packed up my little all as well as I could, and went off.

Translations

Conjunction

all

  1. (obsolete) Although.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, volume 2, London: Ponsonbie, OCLC 243035665:
      And those two froward sisters, their faire loves, / Came with them eke, all they were wondrous loth.

Derived terms

Terms derived from the adverb, determiner, pronoun or noun all

Adjective

all

  1. (Pennsylvania, dialect) All gone; dead.
    The butter is all.

Derived terms

Related terms

See also


References

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “all”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams


Albanian

Etymology

From Ottoman Turkish آل(al).

Adjective

all m (feminine alle)

  1. of glowing, reddish color

References

  1. ^ Bufli, Gjorgji; Luciano, Rocchi (2021), “all”, in A historical-etymological dictionary of Turkisms in Albanian (1555–1954), Trieste: Edizioni Università di Trieste, page 36

Breton

Pronunciation

Adjective

all

  1. other

Derived terms


Catalan

Etymology

From Latin allium. Compare Occitan alh, French ail, Spanish ajo).

Pronunciation

Noun

all m (plural alls)

  1. garlic
  2. garlic clove

Derived terms

Further reading


Estonian

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *alla.

Postposition

all

  1. under, below (Governs the genitive)

Derived terms


German

Etymology

From Middle High German al, from Old High German al, from Proto-West Germanic *all, from Proto-Germanic *allaz. Cognate with English all.

Pronunciation

Determiner

all

  1. all
    Alle Menschen sind gleich.
    All people are equal.
    Du musst doch nicht allen Unsinn nachmachen, den du hörst!
    You needn't reproduce all nonsense that you hear!
    • 1843, Karl Ludwig Kannegießer (translation from Italian into German), Die göttliche Komödie des Dante Alighieri, 4th edition, 1st part, Leipzig, p. 84:
      ... / Nachdem, von Wuth und Grausamkeit entbronnen, / Der Weiberschwarm die Männer all erschlug.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. every (in time intervals, with plural noun)
    Wir treffen uns alle zwei Wochen.
    We meet up every two weeks.

Usage notes

  • The bare form all is used with articles and pronouns, which it precedes (as in English). For instance: all die Sachen (all the things); all dies Gerede (all this chitchat); all meine Freunde (all my friends) (more common with the e). Colloquial German often uses the adjective ganz instead: die ganzen Sachen; dies ganze Gerede; meine ganzen Freunde.

Declension

Declension of aller
masculine feminine neuter plural
nominative aller alle alles alle
genitive alles
allen
aller alles
allen
aller
dative allem aller allem allen
accusative allen alle alles alle

Derived terms

Further reading

  • all” in Duden online
  • all” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Gothic

Romanization

all

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐌻𐌻

Luxembourgish

Etymology

From Middle High German and Old High German al.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

all

  1. (with uncountable or plural nouns) all
  2. (with countable singular nouns) every; each
    Et muss een net mat all Virschlag eens sinn.
    One needn’t agree to every proposition.

Usage notes

  • The word is usually uninflected, except for the dative plural, which becomes allen.

Synonyms

Derived terms


Middle English

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old English eall, from Proto-West Germanic *all, from Proto-Germanic *allaz.

Pronunciation

Adverb

all

  1. all (entirely, completely)

Determiner

all

  1. all, every
    • c. 1395, John Wycliffe, John Purvey , transl., Bible (Wycliffite Bible (later version), MS Lich 10.)‎, published c. 1410, Coꝛinthis ·ii· 11:9, page 72r, column 2; republished as Wycliffe's translation of the New Testament, Lichfield: Bill Endres, 2010:
      ⁊ whanne I was a mong ȝou ⁊ hadde nede .· I was chargeouſe to no man / foꝛ bꝛiþeren þat camen fro macedonye fulfilliden þat þat failide to me / ⁊ in alle þingis I haue kept and ſchal kepe me wiþouten charge to ȝou
      And when I was amongst you and felt need, I wasn't burdensome to anybody, because brothers who came from Macedonia provided whatever I didn't have. So in everything, I've kept, and will keep, myself from burdening you.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • English: all
    • Northumbrian: aal
  • Scots: a', a, aw; aa, aal
  • Yola: aul, aal, all, al

References


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse allr.

Determiner

all (neuter singular alt, plural alle)

  1. all

Derived terms

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old Norse allr, from Proto-Germanic *allaz (all), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂el- (all). Cognate with Faroese and Icelandic allur, Swedish all and Danish al. Akin to English all.

Pronunciation

Adjective

all m or f (neuter alt, plural alle)

  1. all
  2. (in the plural) everybody
  3. over, at an end, finished
    Sumaren er all.The summer is at an end.
    • 1773, E. Storm, Paa Kongjens Føssilsdag:
      Mæin kor tæk mid Drikkjen, Jula æ no oull, / Kagga vor aa Bolla æ baa tur aa koull?
      But where do we take the drink? Christmas is over, you know, / our keg and our bowl are both dry and cold.
  4. tired, exhausted, worn out; weak
    Skorne er alleThe shoes are worn out.
  5. dead
    Han er mest all.He’s almost dead.

Declension

Derived terms

References


Old English

Pronunciation

Adjective

all (Anglian)

  1. Alternative form of eall

Declension

Adverb

all (Anglian)

  1. Alternative form of eall

Pennsylvania German

Etymology

From Middle High German and Old High German al. Compare German all, Dutch al, English all.

Adjective

all

  1. all

Related terms


Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish alder, from Old Norse allr, from Proto-Germanic *allaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂el-.

Pronunciation

Determiner

all (neuter allt, masculine alle, plural alla)

  1. all
    Drack du upp all mjölk?
    Did you drink all the milk?

Usage notes

All (with inflections) is used with mass nouns. The corresponding for nouns with ordinary plural is alla.

A masculine-looking form (alle) is virtually only retained in the fixed expressions alle man and allesamman (everyone).

See also


Welsh

Pronunciation

Verb

all

  1. Soft mutation of gall.

Mutation

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
gall all ngall unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Yola

Adverb

all

  1. Alternative form of aul
    • 1867, “A YOLA ZONG”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 1:
      Th’ weithest all curcagh, wafur, an cornee.
      You seem all snappish, uneasy, and fretful.

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 84