me

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English

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Wikipedia

Etymology 1

From Middle English me, from Old English (me, originally dative, but later also accusative), from Proto-West Germanic *miʀ, from Proto-Germanic *miz (me), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁me- (me).

Pronunciation

Pronoun

me (first-person singular pronoun, referring to the speaker)

  1. The first-person singular, as the object (of a verb, preposition, etc).
    1. As the object (direct or indirect) of a verb.
      Can you hear me?
      He gave me this.
    2. (archaic, proscribed) Myself; as a reflexive direct object of a verb.
    3. (colloquial, proscribed) Myself; as a reflexive indirect object of a verb; the ethical dative.
      • 1993 April, Harper's Magazine:
        When I get to college, I'm gonna get me a white Nissan Sentra.
    4. As the object of a preposition.
      Come with me.
  2. (sometimes proscribed) As the complement of the copula (be).
    It wasn't me.
    • 2017, Theresa May, “Andrew Neil interviews Theresa May: full transcript”, in The Spectator, archived from the original on 22 May 2017:
      It's either me or Jeremy Corbyn.
  3. Used for the pronoun in isolation or in apposition.
    Who's there? —Me.
    Who did this? —Me. I did it. (≈ It was me. I did it.)
  4. (nonstandard or proscribed) I, the first-person singular, as the subject.
    1. (informal, with a conjunction, often proscribed) As the subject of a verb.
      Me and my friends played a game.
      literally all me and my astrophysicist colleagues could talk about.
      Stella and me have opted to take a course called 'Autobiography and Fiction'.
    2. (nonstandard, not with a conjunction) As the subject of a verb. Sometimes used to indicate or imitate limited English fluency.
      • 1844, Charles Wilkes, Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition, volume II:
        One of them, whose sobriquet was Big-headed Blackboy, was stretched out before the fire, and no answer could be obtained from him, but a drawling repetition, in grunts of displeasure, of "Bel (not) me want to go.
      • 1899 July 20, Mrs. A J McKelway , “Children’s Department”, in A[lexander] J[effrey] McKelway, editor, Presbyterian Standard, volume XLI, number 28, Charlotte, N.C.: The Presbyterian Publishing Company, page 14, column 1:
        Well he said me mustn’t eat ’nanas cause ’nanas would make me sick.
      • 2005 October 10, Michael Chapman; Matthew Chapman, “Teen Girl Squad Issue #10”, in Homestar Runner, spoken by Strong Bad (Matthew Chapman):
        Whoa! That was about the coolest thing ever! Me gotta see that again.
    3. (nonstandard, in apposition) Would be the subject of a copula in standard English, though the copula is omitted; used to indicate or imitate limited English fluency.
      • 1932 June, Katherine Albert, “Hey! Hey! Here Comes Johnny”, in James R. Quirk, editor, Photoplay, volume XLII, number 1, Chicago, Ill.: Photoplay Publishing Company, page 119, column 2:
        “I should stick to Tarzan,” he [Johnny Weissmuller] explains. “You see, I’m no actor. Well, I didn’t have to act in ‘Tarzan, the Ape Man’—just said, ‘Me Tarzan, you Jane.’ I'll never be able to act.”
        The words do not occur in the film itself, nor in the original book by Burroughs. Instead, Tarzan says “Tarzan” and “Jane” repeatedly.
      • 1954 February 3, Mrs. John F. Underhill, “The Last Leaf; Chapter Three: Bear Tracks”, in Lawrence Maxwell, editor, Junior Guide, volume 2, number 5, Washington, D.C., page 7, column 2:
        May opened the door, and a huge Indian walked into the room. “Me Bear Tracks,” he said. “Me hungry.”
Usage notes
This section or entry lacks references or sources. Please help verify this information by adding appropriate citations. You can also discuss it at the Tea Room.

Me is traditionally described as the objective pronoun, meaning it is used as the object of verbs and prepositions, while the subjective pronoun I should be used as the subject of verbs. However, "objective" pronouns are widely used as the subject of verbs in colloquial speech when they are accompanied by a conjunction, for example, "me and her are friends". This usage is traditionally considered incorrect, and "she and I are friends" is the prescriptive construction.

Using me as the lone subject of a verb (without a conjunction, e.g. "me want", "me like") is a feature of various types of both pidgin English and that of infant English-learners, and is sometimes used by speakers of standard English for jocular effect (e.g. "me likee", "me wantee").

Although in some dialects 'me' is also used as a possessive, in writing, speakers of these dialects usually write my.

Some prescriptivists object to the use of me following the verb be, as in "It wasn't me". The phrase "It was not I" is prescribed as correct, though this may be seen as extreme and used for jocular effect.

Synonyms
  • (subject of a verb): I; my ass (vulgar)
  • (complement of the copula): I
  • (indirect object): us (Australia, UK)
  • (marking ownership): my; mine (archaic)
Derived terms
Related terms
Descendants
  • Bislama: mi
  • Jamaican Creole: mi
  • Nigerian Pidgin: mi
  • Pijin: mi
  • Sranan Tongo: mi
Translations

Noun

me (plural mes)

  1. The self or personality of the speaker, especially their authentic self.
    Synonym: I
    • 1871, George MacDonald, “[At the Back of the North Wind] Out in the Storm”, in Harry Thurston Peck, Frank R[ichard] Stockton, Julian Hawthorne, editors, Masterpieces of the World’s Literature, Ancient and Modern: The Great Authors of the World with Their Master Productions, volume XIV, New York, N.Y.: American Literary Society, published 1899, pages 7514–7515:
      “Quite easily. Here you are taking care of a poor little boy with one arm, and there you are sinking a ship with the other. It can’t be like you.” “Ah, but which is me? I can’t be two mes, you know.” “No. Nobody can be two mes.” “Well, which me is me?” “Now I must think. There looks to be two.” “Yes. That’s the very point—You can’t be knowing the thing you don’t know, can you?” “No.” “Which me do you know?” “The kindest, goodest, best me in the world,” answered Diamond, clinging to North Wind. [] “Do you know the other me as well?” “No. I can’t. I shouldn’t like to.” “There it is. You don’t know the other me. You are sure of one of them?” “Yes.” “And you are sure there can’t be two mes?” “Yes.” “Then the me you don’t know must be the same as the me you do know—else there would be two mes?” “Yes.” “Then the other me you don’t know must be as kind as the me you do know?”
    • 1948 January, Rog Phillips [pseudonym; Roger Phillip Graham], “Hate”, in Amazing Stories, volume 22, number 1, Chicago, Ill.: Ziff-Davis Publishing Company, page 69, column 2:
      The question seems unanswerable, because if those same atoms were to be collected as they leave my body as waste in the normal process of metabolism, and in a year when my body contained all new atoms, those old atoms which were me a year ago were reformed into an exact replica of me down to the last thought and cell, would there be two mes?
    • 1990, Bei Dao [pseudonym; Zhao Zhenkai], translated by Bonnie S. McDougall and Susette Ternent Cooke, Waves, New York, N.Y.: New Directions Publishing, →ISBN, page 158:
      “In these last few days I keep feeling that I’m changing, changing into something I don’t quite recognize myself.” / “You’ve become more like yourself.” / “Could there be two mes?” / “Perhaps more than two.” / “It gets worse and worse. So which me do you actually love ?” / “All of them.” / “You’re being slippery.” Her lips curled slyly. “In fact you only love the me in your mind’s eye, and that me doesn’t exist, right?” / “No, that’s the combination of all the yous.” / She laughed. “It’s just as complicated as a mathematical calculation, if you end up with the three-headed, six-armed me, could you stand that?”

Etymology 2

Variant form.

Determiner

me

  1. (UK regional, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, colloquial) Alternative form of my
    • a. 1918, Wilfred Owen, “The Letter”, in Douglas Kerr, editor, The Works of Wilfred Owen, page 54:
      There don't seem much to say just now. / (Yer what? Then don't, yer ruddy cow! / And give us back me cigarette!)
    • 1994, John Hodge, Shallow Grave, spoken by Alex Law (Ewan McGregor):
      I want me money back!
    • 1995, Nick Park, A Close Shave:
      Get off me cheese! Get off! Get off!
    • 2016, Alan Moore, Jerusalem, Liveright, page 99:
      "What have I ever done to prove me worth, or where I could at least say as I'd made a difference?"
Translations

Etymology 3

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

me

  1. (music) The solfeggio syllable used to indicate the flat of the third note of a major scale.

See also

References

  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin,

Anagrams

Akan

Pronoun

me

  1. I
    Mete Twi kasa.
    I speak Twi.

Albanian

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Proto-Albanian *me(t). Cognate to Ancient Greek μετά (metá, after, beyond; in the middle, between), Gothic miþ (with), Old Norse með.

Preposition

me (+accusative)

  1. with (accompanied by)
    Shkoj me tim vëlla.
    I'm going with my brother.
  2. with (possessing)
    E sheh djalin me sytë e kaltër?
    Do you see the guy with blue eyes?
  3. with (by means of)
    Preferoj të shkruaj me penë.
    I prefer to write with a pen.

Etymology 2

From Proto-Indo-European *manu, compare Ancient Greek μανός (manós, thin), Old Armenian մանր (manr, small). Alternatively it could represent a continuation of Proto-Indo-European *mṇi̯ō, to be compared with Latin minuō (lessen), Proto-Slavic *mьnь (smaller) and the like.

Adjective

me (feminine mee)

  1. insufficient, scanty, not full
Derived terms

Angloromani

Alternative forms

Etymology

Inherited from Romani me.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

me

  1. I
    Synonyms: mandi, tutti

Annobonese

Etymology

From Portuguese mãe (mother).

Noun

me

  1. mother

References

  • John H. McWhorter (2005) Defining Creole (in Annobonese)

Aragonese

Etymology

From Latin me. Akin to Spanish me and French me.

Pronoun

me

  1. First-person singular dative, accusative and prepositional pronoun; me

Usage notes

  • Takes the form m' before verbs beginning with vowel sounds.

See also

References

  • me”, in Aragonario, diccionario castellano–aragonés (in Spanish)

Asturian

Alternative forms

  • m' (before a vowel)

Etymology

From Latin , accusative singular of ego. As an indirect pronoun, possibly in part from Latin mihi (dative singular of ego), through a Vulgar Latin *mi.

Pronoun

me

  1. me (first-person singular direct pronoun)
  2. me (first-person singular indirect pronoun)

Atong (India)

Alternative forms

Etymology

From English (May).

Pronunciation

Noun

me (Bengali script মে)

  1. May

Synonyms

References

Breton

Etymology

From Proto-Brythonic *mi, from Proto-Celtic *mī, from Proto-Indo-European *me (me). Cognate to Welsh mi.

Pronoun

me

  1. I, me

Carolinian

Conjunction

me

  1. and

Catalan

Etymology 1

Inherited from Latin (accusative of ego).

Pronunciation

Pronoun

me (enclitic, contracted 'm, proclitic em, contracted proclitic m')

  1. me (direct or indirect object)
Usage notes
  • -me is the full (plena) form of the pronoun. It is normally used after verbs ending with a consonant or ⟨u⟩, or between some adverbs/pronouns and a verb. In some varieties of Catalan (Balearic/Valencian) it can also occur in sentence-initial position.
    Segueix-me!Follow me!
    Tant me fa. (after adverb)I don't care.
    Me sembla que… (sentence-initial, nonstandard)It seems that…
Declension
Related terms

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

Noun

me f (uncountable)

  1. (colloquial, childish, euphemistic) poo

Chuukese

Conjunction

me

  1. and

Preposition

me

  1. from

Cimbrian

Article

me

  1. (Sette Comuni) the; definite article for two declensions:
    1. dative singular masculine
    2. dative singular neuter

See also

Cimbrian definite articles
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative dar de / di 's / z de / di
Accusative in de / di 's / z de / di
Dative me dar me in

References

  • “me” in Martalar, Umberto Martello, Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Cornish

Alternative forms

  • my (Standard Cornish, Standard Written Form)

Pronoun

me

  1. (Standard Cornish) I, me

Dutch

Pronunciation

Pronoun

me

  1. objective unstressed form of ik (I)

Inflection

Synonyms

Pronoun

me (dependent possessive)

  1. Pronunciation spelling of mijn (my).

Estonian

Etymology

Short form of meie, from Proto-Finnic *mek.

Pronoun

me (genitive me, partitive meid)

  1. we

Declension

Declension of me
1st person singular plural
long short long short
nominative mina ma meie me
genitive minu mu meie me
partitive mind meid
illative minusse musse meisse
inessive minus mus meis
elative minust must meist
allative minule mulle meile
adessive minul mul meil
ablative minult mult meilt
translative minuks meieks meiks
terminative minuni meieni
essive minuna meiena
abessive minuta meieta
comitative minuga muga meiega

See also

Fala

Etymology

From Old Galician-Portuguese me, from Latin .

Pronoun

me

  1. First person singular dative and accusative pronoun; me

Usage notes

  • Takes the form -mi when suffixed to an impersonal verb form.

See also

References

  • Valeš, Miroslav (2021) Diccionariu de A Fala: lagarteiru, mañegu, valverdeñu (web), 2nd edition, Minde, Portugal: CIDLeS, published 2022, →ISBN

Finnish

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *mek, from Proto-Uralic *me. The word is inflected as plural, but there is no plural marker in the nominative, except in dialects (met).

Pronunciation

Pronoun

me

  1. we
    Me emme unohda.We will not forget.
    Näin meidän kesken...Just between us...
    Mennäänkö meille?Should we go over to our place?

Usage notes

  • When the verb shows both the person and the number, the pronoun may be left out in written Finnish and is usually only used for emphasis. However, the inflected forms are often used. In colloquial Finnish, the pronoun is almost always used, even with a verb. (compare the usage of minä (I)).
  • See this appendix for information on the dialectal variants of me.

Inflection

  • Irregular (inflectional stem mei-, as if in the plural). The comitative and instructive forms don't exist; the abessive is hardly used.
  • In addition to the standard set of cases, me and the other personal pronouns have a specific accusative form, meidät.

Synonyms

Derived terms

compounds

Descendants

See also

Further reading

  • me”, in Kielitoimiston sanakirja [Dictionary of Contemporary Finnish]‎ (in Finnish) (online dictionary, continuously updated), Kotimaisten kielten keskuksen verkkojulkaisuja 35, Helsinki: Kotimaisten kielten tutkimuskeskus (Institute for the Languages of Finland), 2004–, retrieved 2023-07-03

Anagrams

French

Etymology

From Middle French me, from Old French me, from Latin (accusative of ego), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁me- (me). Northern dialects have preserved a form mi for the indirect object (also found in Old French in the Oaths of Strasbourg), from Latin mihi, dative singular of ego, through a Vulgar Latin *mi, whereas in standard French, it has merged into me.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

me (personal, objective case)

  1. (direct object) me
    Est-ce que tu me vois ?Do you see me?
  2. (indirect object) to me
    Émilien me donne un peu d’argent.Émilien gave some money to me.

Related terms

Further reading

Galician

Pronoun

me

  1. inflection of eu:
    1. accusative/dative
    2. reflexive

Guaraní

Noun

me

  1. male
  2. husband

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French mai (May).

Pronunciation

Noun

me

  1. May

Hawaiian

Etymology

Cognate with Maori me (and, with, must) and Samoan ma (and, with).

Pronunciation

Preposition

me

  1. with

Icelandic

Pronunciation

Interjection

me

  1. baa (representing the bleating sound sheep make)

Ido

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From English me, French me, Italian me, Spanish me, from Proto-Indo-European *(e)me-, *(e)me-n- (me).

Pronoun

me (first-person singular)

  1. I, me
    Me es tre felica.
    I am very happy.
    Ka vu parolas a me?
    Are you talking to me?
Derived terms
  • mea (“my, mine”)
See also

Etymology 2

From m +‎ -e.

Noun

me (plural me-i)

  1. The name of the Latin script letter M/m.
See also

Istriot

Etymology

From Latin , accusative singular of ego.

Pronoun

me

  1. objective of i; me; to me
    • 1877, Antonio Ive, Canti popolari istriani: raccolti a Rovigno, volume 5, Ermanno Loescher, page 40:
      Ti me pari oûna dea infra li dai,
      You seem to me a goddess among the gods,

Italian

Etymology

From Latin .

Pronunciation

  • (standard, clitic) IPA(key): /me/°
    • Hyphenation: me
  • (standard, disjunctive) IPA(key): /ˈme/*
    • Rhymes: -e
    • Hyphenation:
  • As a clitic pronoun used before another clitic, it is pronounced unstressed and without syntactic gemination of the following consonant, e.g. me ne vado (I'm going away) /me ne ˈvado/. As a disjunctive pronoun used after a preposition, it is pronounced stressed and with syntactic gemination, e.g. a me piace (I like him/her/it) /a‿mˌme‿pˈpjatʃe/ (since a also triggers syntactic gemination).

Pronoun

me (personal, objective case)

  1. (disjunctive, emphatic) me
    (Lui/Lei) non piace a me. / A me non piace (lui/lei).(He/She) does not appeal to me, i.e. I don't like him/her.
    (Lui/Lei) piace a me. / A me piace (lui/lei).(He/She) appeals to me, i.e. I like him/her.
    A me e lui piace lei.She appeals (both) to me and to him, i.e. he and I (both) like her.

Pronoun

me

  1. (clitic) Alternative form of mi

Usage notes

  • Used when followed by a third-person direct object clitic (lo, la, li, le, or ne).

See also

Jamaican Creole

Pronoun

me

  1. Alternative spelling of mi.

Japanese

Romanization

me

  1. The hiragana syllable (me) or the katakana syllable (me) in Hepburn romanization.

Jingpho

Etymology

Borrowed from Burmese မဲ (mai:, mai:).

Noun

me

  1. ballot

References

  • Kurabe, Keita (2016 December 31) “Phonology of Burmese loanwords in Jinghpaw”, in Kyoto University Linguistic Research, volume 35, →DOI, →ISSN, pages 91–128

Kein

Noun

me

  1. louse

Further reading

Khasi

Pronunciation

Pronoun

me

  1. you (singular and masculine), thou

See also

References

  • Bars, E. (1973) “me”, in Khasi-English Dictionary, Shillong, Meghalaya: Don Bosco Press

Latin

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *h₁me- (me). Cognate with Ancient Greek με (me), ἐμέ (emé, me), Sanskrit मा (, me), Old English me, Old Frisian mi, Old Saxon , Dutch mij, Old High German mih (German mich), Old Norse mik, Gothic 𐌼𐌹𐌺 (mik). The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin me, Greek με (me), Old Irish (Irish , Welsh mi), Proto-Slavic *mene (Old Church Slavonic мене (mene), Russian меня́ (menjá)), Lithuanian mi, Albanian mua.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

(personal pronoun)

  1. me, myself; accusative singular of ego
  2. by me, with me, from me; ablative singular of ego

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Aromanian: mi
  • Catalan: me
  • Ligurian: mi
  • Corsican: mi
  • French: me, moi
  • Galician: me
  • Italian: me, mi
  • Mirandese: me
  • Mozarabic: ם (m)
  • Old Galician-Portuguese: me
    • Galician: me
    • Portuguese: me
  • Romanian:
  • Sicilian: mi
  • Spanish: me

References

  • me in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • me in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Lolopo

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Proto-Loloish *ʔ-mwe³ (Bradley), from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *s/r-m(u/i/ja)l. Cognate with Nuosu (mix), Burmese အမွေး (a.mwe:), Drung meul (body hair), Jingpho mun, Tedim Chin mul¹.

Noun

me 

  1. (Yao'an) body hair

Etymology 2

From Proto-Loloish *s-mo¹ (Bradley). Cognate with Nuosu (hmu), Burmese မှို (hmui), Gong มู๋, Naxi mul, Japhug jmɤɣ and Jingpho kämu.

Noun

me 

  1. (Yao'an) mushroom

Mandarin

Romanization

me (me5me0, Zhuyin ˙ㄇㄜ)

  1. Hanyu Pinyin reading of
  2. Hanyu Pinyin reading of
  3. Hanyu Pinyin reading of
  4. Hanyu Pinyin reading of ,
  5. Hanyu Pinyin reading of

me

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notes

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Maori

Etymology

Cognate with Hawaiian me (with) and Samoan ma (and, with).

Particle

me

  1. Conjunctive
    1. and (joins two noun phrases)
    2. with (indicates people or things present when an event occurs)
  2. Definitive
    1. must, should (used before verbs to form a weak command)
    2. must be (used before nouns and adjectives)
      Me whā rawa?
      Must it be four?
    3. how should it be done (used before pēhea and a clause)
  3. Comparative
    1. if only (reverses what is stated)
    2. as if, like (simile)
    3. to see whether

References

  • "me" - Maori Dictionary

Mauritian Creole

Etymology

From French mai.

Noun

me

  1. May

Mbyá Guaraní

Noun

me

  1. husband

Mengen

Noun

me

  1. (drinkable) water
  2. any liquid
  3. (non-tidal) stream, river

References

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English , from Proto-Indo-European. More at English me.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

me (nominative I)

  1. me (first-person singular accusative pronoun)
  2. (reflexive) myself
Descendants
See also

References

Etymology 2

Determiner

me (nominative I)

  1. Alternative form of mi.

References

Etymology 3

From man, men, by way of phonemic reduction in unstressed positions.

Pronoun

me

  1. Typically singular, indefinite pronoun: one, you (indefinite).
See also
References

Middle French

Alternative forms

  • m' (before a vowel)

Etymology

From Old French me.

Pronoun

me

  1. me, first-person singular object pronoun
  2. to me, first-person singular indirect object pronoun

Synonyms

  • (first-person singular object and indirect object pronoun): moy (with verbs in the imperative)

Descendants

  • French: me

Nalca

Noun

me

  1. son
  2. child

Nauruan

Conjunction

me

  1. and

Naxi

Etymology

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *ma.

Adverb

me

  1. not

References

  • Naxi Dictionary by T.M. Pinson, Lijiang 2012

Neapolitan

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin .

Pronunciation

Pronoun

me

  1. me (accusative or dative or reflexive or prepositional)

Coordinate terms

Number Person Nominative Accusative Dative Reflexive Possessive Prepositional
singular first-person io (i') me mìo, mìa, mieje, meje me, méne
second-person, familiar tu te tùjo, tòja, tùoje, tòje te, téne
second-person, formal vuje ve vuósto, vósta, vuóste, vóste vuje
third-person, masculine ìsso 'o, 'u (lo, lu) 'i, 'e (li, le) se sùjo, sòja, sùoje, sòje ìsso
third-person, feminine éssa 'a (la) 'e (le) éssa
plural first-person nuje ce nuósto, nòsta, nuóste, nòste nuje
second-person, plural vuje ve vuósto, vòsta, vuóste, vòste vuje
third-person, masculine ìsse 'i, 'e (li, le) llòro se llòro (invariable) llòro
third-person, feminine llòro 'e (le)

Norman

Alternative forms

  • (continental Normandy, Jersey)
  • maïr (Guernsey)

Noun

me f (plural mes)

  1. (Sark) sea

North Frisian

Pronoun

me

  1. First-person singular, objective: me

Northern Kurdish

Etymology 1

Pronoun

me

  1. oblique form of em: us, we

Etymology 2

Verb

me

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bûn
    Synonym: im

Northern Qiang

Pronunciation

Noun

me

  1. fire

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Old Norse mit, a form of vit (we two, the both of us) influenced by the final -m in Old Norse verbs inflected in the first person plural.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

me (object case oss)

  1. we
    Kva skal me gjera?
    What shall we do?
Alternative forms

See also

Etymology 2

Pronoun

me

  1. eye dialect spelling of meg (me)
    • 1879, Hallvard Berg, Segner fraa Bygdom, Christiania: Samlaget, page 93:
      "No, Unga, kunne de slutte mæ Lesnae ei Stund o høyre paa me."
      "Now, kids, you stop with the reading for a while and listen to me."

References

Anagrams

Old English

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *miʀ.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

  1. (personal) accusative/dative of

Usage notes

  • Was originally only dative/instrumental, but by the literary period is also the accusative form in West Saxon. The Anglian dialects have retained the inherited accusative form, mec.

Descendants

  • Middle English: me
    • English: me
    • Scots: me

Old French

Etymology

From Latin , accusative of ego. As an indirect object pronoun, possibly in part from Latin mihi, dative singular of ego, through a Vulgar Latin *mi (compare the form mi in particular, found in early Old French in the Oaths of Strasbourg).

Pronoun

me

  1. myself (first-person singular reflexive pronoun)
  2. me (first-person singular direct object pronoun)
  3. to me (first-person singular indirect object pronoun)

Related terms

Descendants

  • Middle French: me
    • French: me

Pali

Alternative forms

Pronoun

me

  1. enclitic genitive/dative/instrumental/ablative singular of ahaṃ
    • c. 50 BC, The Buddha, Dhammapada(pāḷi), Yamakavagga, page 26; republished in The Eighteenth Book in the Suttanta-Pitaka: Khuddaka-Nikāya, Colombo, 2009:
      3. අක‍්කොච‍්ඡි මං අවධි මං අජිනි මං අහාසි මෙ
      යෙ තං උපනය‍්හන‍්ති වෙරං තෙසං න සම‍්මති
      3. akkocchi maṃ avadhi maṃ ajini maṃ ahāsi me
      ye taṃ upanayhanti veraṃ tesaṃ na sammati
      He abused me, he struck me, he defeated me, he robbed me.
      Hatred does not subside for those who nurse grudges thus.
      (Wiktionary translation adapted from translation of the Pali by Ajahn Sujato.)
    • 2006, The Fourth Book in the Suttanta-Pitaka: Majjhimanikāya (I), page 192:
      සෙය්‍යථාපි නාම ජරසාලාය ගොපානසියො ඔලුග‍්ගවිලුග‍්ගා භවන‍්ති, එවමෙවස‍්සු මෙ ඵාසුළියො ඔලුග‍්ගවිලුග‍්ගා භවන‍්ති තායෙවප‍්පාහාරතාය.
      Seyyathāpi nāma jarasālāya gopānasiyo oluggaviluggā bhavanti, evamevassu me phāsuḷiyo oluggaviluggā bhavanti tāyevappāhāratāya.
      Truly, just as in a decrepit outhouse the rafters are crumbling, my ribs were just that way, they were crumbling from just this fasting.

Pennsylvania German

Etymology

Compare German einem.

Pronunciation

Article

me

  1. dative masculine/neuter singular of en: a, an

Declension

Declension of en
masculine feminine neuter plural
nominative en en en
dative emme
me
re emme
me
accusative en en en

Polish

Pronunciation

Pronoun

me

  1. Alternative form of moje

Interjection

me

  1. (onomatopoeia) used to imitate the sound of a sheep or ram, baa
    Synonym: be

Derived terms

interjection

Portuguese

Etymology

From Old Galician-Portuguese me, from Latin (accusative of ego), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)me-. As an objective indirect pronoun, possibly in part from Latin mihi (dative of ego), through a Vulgar Latin *mi.

Pronunciation

 

  • Hyphenation: me

Pronoun

me

  1. first-person singular objective direct personal pronoun; me
    Meus amigos me ligaram.
    My friends called me.
  2. first-person singular objective indirect personal pronoun; (to) me
    Dê-me o copo.
    Give me the glass.
  3. first-person singular reflexive pronoun; myself
    Este tipo de tratamento me faz querer me enforcar.
    This kind of treatment makes me want to hang myself.
  4. particle of spontaneity, when it indicates that there was spontaneity in the action by its agent.
    Fui-me embora daquele lugar.
    I left that place..

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:me.

See also

Portuguese personal pronouns (edit)
Number Person Nominative
(subject)
Accusative
(direct object)
Dative
(indirect object)
Prepositional Prepositional
with com
Non-declining
m f m f m and f m f m f m f
Singular First eu me mim comigo
Second tu te ti contigo você
o senhor a senhora
Third ele ela o
(lo, no)
a
(la, na)
lhe ele ela com ele com ela o mesmo a mesma
se si consigo
Plural First nós nos nós connosco (Portugal)
conosco (Brazil)
a gente
Second vós vos vós convosco, com vós vocês
os senhores as senhoras
Third eles elas os
(los, nos)
as
(las, nas)
lhes eles elas com eles com elas os mesmos as mesmas
se si consigo
Indefinite se si consigo

Romani

Pronoun

me

  1. I

Descendants

  • Angloromani: me
  • Vlax Romani: me

See also


Romanian

Etymology

Onomatopoeic.

Interjection

me

  1. baa (sound made by sheep or goats)

Sassarese

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin and, as an indirect object pronoun, possibly in part from mihi.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

me

  1. (preceded by a preposition) me
    • 1989, Giovanni Maria Cherchi, “Primabéra [Spring]”, in La poesia di l'althri [The poetry of others] (overall work in Italian and Sassarese), Sassari: Arnoldo Mondadori Editore, page 13:
      Lu branu a me no piazi
      I don't like spring
      (literally, “The spring to me is not pleasant”)

Related terms

See also

References

  • Rubattu, Antoninu (2006) Dizionario universale della lingua di Sardegna, 2nd edition, Sassari: Edes

Scottish Gaelic

Alternative forms

Etymology

From mar eisimpleir.

Adverb

me

  1. e.g.

Serbo-Croatian

Pronoun

me (Cyrillic spelling ме)

  1. of me (genitive singular of (I))
  2. me (accusative singular of (I))

Declension

Slovene

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

Pronoun

mẹ̑

  1. we (feminine and neuter plural, more than two)

Inflection

See also

Spanish

Etymology

Inherited from Latin (accusative singular of ego), from Proto-Indo-European *(h₁)me-. As an indirect object, possibly in part from Latin mihi (dative of ego), through a Vulgar Latin *mi.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /me/
  • Rhymes: -e
  • Syllabification: me

Pronoun

me (objective case)

  1. (personal) accusative of yo: me
  2. (personal, dative pronoun) dative of yo: to me, for me
  3. (personal, reflexive) reflexive of yo: myself

See also

Further reading

Sumerian

Romanization

me

  1. Romanization of 𒈨 (me)

Swedish

Preposition

me

  1. (colloquial) Apocopic form of med (with)
    Ja vill inte va me (Jag vill inte vara med)
    I don't wanna join

Tagalog

Etymology 1

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation

Noun

(Baybayin spelling ᜋᜒ)

  1. maa (bleat cry of a goat or sheep)
    Synonym: (obsolete) ii
Alternative forms

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

Particle

me (Baybayin spelling ᜋᜒ)

  1. Pronunciation spelling of may.

Further reading

  • me”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018

Turkish

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈme/ (standard)
  • IPA(key): /ˈmeː/ (overall more common)

Noun

me

  1. baa (sound of a sheep)
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

Noun

me

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter M/m.

See also

Vietnamese

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Compare Acehnese (tamarind).

Noun

(classifier cây, trái, quả) me ()

  1. tamarind

Etymology 2

Noun

me

  1. mother
    Synonyms: mẹ, ma
    • 1936, Vũ Trọng Phụng, chapter 3, in Số đỏ, Hà Nội báo:
      Bà chủ vừa đặt con chó xuống vừa nhanh nhẩu nói: – À cậu tắm ! Cậu của me ngoan. Me đi vắng, ở nhà có đứa nào đánh cậu không ? Loulou Huýt! Huýt...
      The mistress of the house set down the dog and promptly said, "Ah, you are bathing! Mommy's son is nice. While mommy went away, did anyone hit you? Loulou, whee whee!"

West Makian

Pronunciation

Pronoun

me (possessive prefixes mV (animate) and dV (inanimate))

  1. third-person singular pronoun, he, she, it, etc.

See also

References

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours, Pacific linguistics

White Hmong

Etymology

This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.
Particularly: “From the same kind of sound-symbolic reasoning as Ancient Greek νᾶνος (nânos, dwarf)? This is so funny to think about LOL - words like "me" and "nano-" potentially coming from labial playground-tier teases like "neener meener neener"”

Pronunciation

Adjective

me

  1. little; small (size or quantity)

Derived terms

References

  • Heimbach, Ernest E. (1979) White Hmong — English Dictionary, SEAP Publications, →ISBN, pages 125-6.

Yola

Pronoun

me

  1. Alternative form of mee
    • 1867, “ABOUT AN OLD SOW GOING TO BE KILLED”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 3, page 106:
      A plaauge apan Portheare! Hea'de luther me waal,
      A plague upon Porter, he'd hide me well,

References

  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828) William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867, page 106

Zazaki

Pronoun

me

  1. me

See also

Zou

Noun

me

  1. curry

References