ne

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Translingual

Symbol

ne

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Nepali.

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English ne, from Old English ne, from Proto-West Germanic *ne, from Proto-Germanic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Cognates include Gothic 𐌽𐌹 (ni), Latin , Sanskrit (na), Bulgarian, Serbo-Croatian and Russian не (ne), Lithuanian ne, Irish .

Adverb

ne (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Not.
    • c1500, Melusine (translation):
      For she ne dare doo, but to commande.
    • 1512, Robert Copland, The History of Helyas, Knight of The Swan:
      And whan the good quene herde these pyteous tydynges lytel lacked that the ne dyed for sorowe / wherfore all lamentably the began to complayne her sayenge.
    • c1520, Andria by Terence (translation):
      This shold haue bene his skuce at the lest / And it ne had bene but good & honest.
    • c1520, Andria by Terence (translation):
      O so incessaunt thow ad in thy desyre / For so that thow thy mynde now mayst haue / Thow ne caryst what thow dost requyre.
    • 1550, The Mirror for Magistrates:
      For he ne had, nor could increase his line.
    • 1562, Arthur Brooke, The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet:
      In geving me to him whom I ne can, ne may, ne ought to love.
    • 1576, William Lambarde, A perambulation of Kent:
      Mary (quoth the king) so might me mine, ne haddest thou been Earle Godwine: casting in his dish the murder of his brother Alfred, which was done to death at Elie by the Counsell of Godwine.
    • 1579, Immeritô [pseudonym; Edmund Spenser], The Shepheardes Calender: , London: Hugh Singleton, , →OCLC; reprinted as H Oskar Sommer, editor, The Shepheardes Calender , London: John C. Nimmo, , 1890, →OCLC:
      Ne durst again his fieri face out-show.
    • 1587, George Gascoigne, Francis Kinwelmershe, Jocasta:
      Ioc: How can that be and thou my ioy in warre? Po: Henceforth n'am I your ioy ne yet your sonne.
    • c. 1590, William Fowler, The Works of William Fowler:
      What happs might chance me I ne knewe.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, “(please specify the book)”, in The Faerie Queene. , London: [John Wolfe] for William Ponsonbie, →OCLC:
      His forces faile, ne can no lenger fight.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, “(please specify the book)”, in The Faerie Queene. , London: [John Wolfe] for William Ponsonbie, →OCLC:
      As when a ship, that flyes faire vnder saile, / An hidden rocke escaped hath vnwares, / That lay in waite her wrack for to bewaile, / The Marriner yet halfe amazed stares / At perill past, and yet it doubt ne dares / To ioy at his foole-happie ouersight.
    • 1591, John Phillip, A Commemoration on the Life and Death of the Right Honourable, Sir Christopher Hatton:
      And now sweete death most welcome vnto mee, thy stroakes ne can, ne shall me once dismay.
    • 1592, Robert Greene, A Looking Glass for London:
      And twenty thousand infants that ne wot the right hand from the left.
    • 1607, Thomas Walkington, The Optick Glasse of Humors:
      But when he spoke, his plenteous words did flow / Like to thick-falling flakes of winter snow, / Ne any couth his wit so hiely straine.
    • 1614, John Davies of Hereford, Eclogue Between Young Willy the SInger of His Native Pastorals, and Old Wernocke His Friend:
      Now, siker ( Wernocke ) thou hast split the marke / Albe that I ne wot I han mis-song: / But, for I am so yong, I dread my warke / Woll be misualued both of old and yong.
    • 1812, Lord Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto I, 2:
      Whilom in Albion's isle there dwelt a youth, / Who ne in virtue's ways did take delight [...].

Conjunction

ne

  1. (obsolete) Nor.
    • 1484, Original Letters, King Edward the Fifth, under the direction of his Uncle, to Otes Gilbert, Esq., commanding him to receive Knighthood at the expected Coronation:
      That than I shall not geve therunto faith ne credence, nor therfore put them to any maner ponyssement, before that they or any of them so accused may be at their lawful defence and answer.
    • 1489, The gouernayle of helthe:
      And therin is no drede nor bytternes ne expences, but therin is pure recreacyon of body and of soule soo it be donn in clene places.
    • 1489, The gouernayle of helthe:
      Be not to hasty ne sodenly vengeable, to poure folke doo no vyolence.
    • 1489, The gouernayle of helthe:
      Moreouer no man be so hardy to drynk fastyng cold water, ne after that he hath accompanyed wyth a woman, ne after gret trauayle, ne after exersice tyll he haue fyrst rested hym, ne by nyght namely yf he haue do gloue tofore.
    • 1500, The Example of Euyll Tongues:
      A false tonge wyll euer Imagyne and saye / That neuer by creature was sayd ne thought.
    • 1509, Wynkyn de Worde, The fyftene joyes of maryage:
      For chastyce can he not by daye ne nyght his wyfe but by his betynge maketh lyght and hote the loue bytwene her and her frende.
    • 1511, The Records of the City of Norwich:
      Item, that noo woman nor maide weyve any worsted stamynges ne sayes for that that thei be nott of sufficient powre to werke the said worsteddes as thei owte to be wrought, upon payne of iij s iiij d as often as thei be founde wevyng to be devyded and leuyed in maner and forme aboue expressed.
    • 1520, Richard Pynson, The Lyfe of The Blessed Martyr Saynte Thomas:
      That they shulde no lenger kepe ne susteyne Thomas the archebysshope.
    • 1526, The Grete Herball:
      The rote ought to be gadered in the begynnynge of somer and dryed in the sonne bycause [tha]¬t it corrupt ne rotte bycause of the moystnesse[,] & it may be kept two yeres;
    • 1535, Thomas Elyot, The Education or Bringing up of Children:
      For lyinge is a detestable vice, and to be hated of all men, ne to be suffred amonge seruantis ne other persones[,] howe poure estate so euer they be of.
    • 1542, Nicholas Udall, Apophthegms (translation):
      Thus some persones beeyng inuited and exhorted to falle to the studie of lettres, make their excuse that thei bee sickely, that thei can not slepe ne take their naturall reste in the nightes.
    • 1558, Thomas Phaer, The Aeneid (translation):
      We Moores be not so base of wit, ne yet so blunt of mynd.
    • c. 1560, Edward Gosynhill, The Schoolhouse of Women:
      The deuyll gossyp, ought me a shame / And prayde I am nowe, euerye penye I wolde god he had, be blinde and lame / The daye and houre, he fyrste woed me / Ware not gossyp, these chyldren thre I wolde not tary, ye may be sure / Longer with hym, daye ne houre.
    • 1562, Arthur Brooke, The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet:
      Neither extremitie, ne gentle meanes could boote; she hydeth close within her brest, her secret sorowes roote.
    • 1562, Arthur Brooke, The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet:
      Ne on her teares or plaint, at all to have remorse, but (if they can not with her will,) to bring the mayde perforce.
    • 1570, John Thynne, The Debate betweene Pride and Lowlines:
      His hart encreaseth not thereby ne lesseth as edoon these fooles.
    • 1577, The Hereford Municipal Manuscript:
      And that no victualer ne other person or persons forestall any kynde of victualls cominge to the said Cyty or within the precyncte of the same before the same victualls be come to the place.
    • 1587, George Gascoigne, Francis Kinwelmershe, Jocasta:
      Ioc: How can that be and thou my ioy in warre? Po: Henceforth n'am I your ioy ne yet your sonne.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, “Book III, Canto I”, in The Faerie Queene. , London: [John Wolfe] for William Ponsonbie, →OCLC:
      But to her cry they list not lenden eare, / Ne ought the more their mightie strokes surceasse.
    • 1634, W. Lathum, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      Whose worth all outward is in shew alone / But inward sent hath not, ne vertue none.
    • 1798, Samuel Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, ll. 443-6:
      The pang, the curse, with which they died, / Had never pass'd away; / I could not draw my een from theirs / Ne turn them up to pray.
Usage notes
  • Ne survives only as part of the oral tradition in rural Scotland and Northern England. It is almost never used in common speech.

Etymology 2

Adverb

ne

  1. (stenoscript) Abbreviation of any.

Anagrams

Abinomn

Noun

ne (dual nerom, plural nekon)

  1. arrow (projectile)

Afar

Pronunciation

Pronoun

  1. we, us

Usage notes

  • The form née is used when the pronoun isn't followed by a clitic.

See also

References

  • E. M. Parker, R. J. Hayward (1985) “ne”, in An Afar-English-French dictionary (with Grammatical Notes in English), University of London, →ISBN

Ainu

Pronunciation

Verb

ne (Kana spelling )

  1. (intransitive, copulative) to be, become
    Ainu ne ruwe ne.
    He is an Ainu.

Derived terms

See also

  • an (to exist)

Albanian

Alternative forms

Etymology

The nominative-accusative is from accusative Proto-Albanian *nōs, stressed form of clitic Proto-Indo-European *nos, which is continued by the clitic na. Neve and nesh are innovated, but Gheg retains dative nahe (Old Albanian nae) from a genitive *nosōm.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

ne (accusative ne, dative neve, ablative nesh)

  1. we, us

Declension

See also

References

  1. ^ Fialuur i voghel Sccyp e ltinisct (Small Dictionary of Albanian and Latin), page 85, by P. Jak Junkut, 1895, Sckoder
  2. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (1998) “ne”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 289

Blagar

Noun

ne

  1. human, person

References

Breton

Etymology

From Proto-Brythonic *ni.

Particle

ne

  1. not

Usage notes

Used combined with ket, mirroring French ne ... pas.

Catalan

Pronunciation

Pronoun

ne (enclitic, contracted 'n, proclitic en, contracted proclitic n')

  1. represents an indeterminate number or quantity of a given noun
  2. represents a place (associated with the action described by the verb) that would be introduced by the preposition de
  3. replaces a phrase introduced by the preposition de
  4. replaces the object of a causative verb

Usage notes

  • ne cannot be used more than once as the object of a given verb.
  • While ne is usually used to replace phrases beginning with the preposition de, adverbial phrases (eg de pressa) are replaced with hi.
  • ne is sometimes used instead of ho to replace an adjective or indefinite noun as the predicate of a verb.
  • ne is sometimes used popularly to add emphasis to a sentence: in this sense, it has no translation in English.
  • -ne is the full (plena) form of the pronoun. It is normally used after verbs ending with a consonant or ⟨u⟩, or between some adverbs/pronouns and a verb. In some varieties of Catalan (Balearic/Valencian) it can also occur in sentence-initial position.

See also

Chuukese

Conjunction

ne

  1. to (connects verbs)

Preposition

ne

  1. Expressing a fraction or a ratio. Preceded by a nominator and followed by the denominator.

Czech

Etymology

inherited from Old Czech ne, from Proto-Slavic *ne, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Pronunciation

Interjection

ne

  1. no!

Particle

ne

  1. not

See also

Further reading

  • ne in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • ne in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dalmatian

Etymology

From Latin nec, neque. Compare Italian , Spanish, Catalan and French ni, Romanian nici.

Adverb

ne

  1. neither

Deg

Noun

ne

  1. water

References

Dutch

Alternative forms

Etymology

From nen through apocope, itself a contraction of eenen, enen, the now-obsolete accusative form of een.

Pronunciation

Article

ne

  1. (East and West Flanders) a, an
    ne man
    a man

Usage notes

ne is used primarily in dialects that retain the three-way gender split. It is only used for masculine words, while een is used for feminine and neuter words.

The form nen is used before vowels (as the English an) and certain consonants (commonly b, d and t), differing from dialect to dialect.

See also

Anagrams

Eastern Huasteca Nahuatl

Determiner

ne

  1. that.

Pronoun

ne

  1. that.

Esperanto

Etymology

From French ne, Polish nie, Russian не (ne), etc.

Pronunciation

Particle

ne

  1. no
  2. not
  3. non-

Antonyms

Derived terms

  • nei (to say no, to deny)
  • nee (rejectingly, denyingly, with the word no)
  • nea (negative, denying, rejecting)
  • kapnei (to shake one's head no)

Finnish

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *nek, from Proto-Uralic *ne + *-k (dual ending). Compare Erzya не (ńe), неть (ńeť).

The inflectional stem nii- derives from the same stem with the plural infix (-i-), through an older *nij- (< *ne-j-). Compare also se.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

ne (plural, stem nii-)

  1. (demonstrative, of things and animals) nominative plural of se: they, those (objects not pointed at by the speaker)
  2. (colloquial, dialectal, of people) nominative plural of se: they
    Synonym: he

Determiner

ne

  1. nominative plural of se: those (not pointed at by the speaker)
    Tässä ne kirjat nyt ovat.
    This is where those books are now.

Usage notes

See the usage notes under se.

Inflection

The case suffixes are mostly regular (except the inessive and elative singular). Abessive is never used in the singular and extremely seldom in the plural. Instructive niin is more or less a theoretical construction, since it has developed into an adverb, and its current meaning cannot be derived from ne.

Descendants

  • Kven: net
  • Meänkieli: net

See also

Further reading

  • ne”, in Kielitoimiston sanakirja [Dictionary of Contemporary Finnish]‎ (in Finnish) (online dictionary, continuously updated), Kotimaisten kielten keskuksen verkkojulkaisuja 35, Helsinki: Kotimaisten kielten tutkimuskeskus (Institute for the Languages of Finland), 2004–, retrieved 2023-07-03

Anagrams

French

Etymology

From Middle French, from Old French nen or ne preceding words starting in a consonant, from Latin nōn.

Pronunciation

Particle

ne

  1. (literary) not (used alone to negate a verb; now chiefly with only a few particular verbs: see usage notes)
    • 1713, Voltaire, letter, Dec 1713:
      Je ne sais si je dois vous appeler Monsieur ou Mademoiselle [] .
      I don't know if I should call you Mr or Miss.
    • 1826, Victor Hugo, Bug-Jargal, section XXXVIII:
      Le prince de France nous aime, celui d’Espagne ne cesse de nous secourir.
      The prince of France loves us, that of Spain never stops helping us.
    • 1868, Emile Zola, Madeleine Férat:
      Je nose te jurer que je t’aime toujours, parce que je sens bien que tu ne me croirais pas.
      I dare not swear that I still love you, for I sense that you would not believe me.
    • 1943, Jean-Paul Sartre, Réflexions sur la question juive:
      Mais je ne le crois pas : un homme qui trouve naturel de dénoncer des hommes ne peut avoir notre conception de l’humain [] .
      But I don't think so: a man who finds it natural to denounce men cannot have our idea of being human.
    • 1963, Françoise Hardy, L'Amour s'en va:
      L’amour s’en va, et le tien ne saurait durer.
      Love goes away, and yours will not be able to last.
  2. not, no (used before a verb, with a coordinating negative element usually following; see Usage Notes, below)
    • 1851, Henri Murger, Le pays latin:
      Je ne sais rien de plus odieux que l’hypocrisie.
      I don't know anything more odious than hypocrisy.
    • 1998, Michel Houellebecq, Les Particules Élémentaires:
      Bruno se rendit compte qu’il ne serait jamais accepté par les hippies [] .
      Bruno realised that he'd never be accepted by the hippies.
    • 2012 May 3, Le Monde:
      "Il ny a pas eu un truc auquel on ne s’attendait pas", affirme Stéphane Le Foll.
      "There wasn't anything we weren't expecting," stated Stéphane Le Foll.
  3. Used in a subordinate clause before a subjunctive verb (especially when the main verb expresses doubt or fear), to provide extra overtones of doubt or uncertainty (but not negating its verb); the so-called "pleonastic" or "expletive" ne.
    • 1829, Victor Hugo, Le Derner Jour d'un Condamné, section XXVII:
      Ah! mes cheveux blanchiront avant que ma tête ne tombe!
      Oh! My hair will go white before my head falls!
    • 1837, George Sand, Mauprat:
      Oui, mais je crains qu’elle ne soit plus malade qu’elle ne l’avoue, repartit l’abbé.
      "Yes, but I think she might be more ill than she's letting on," the priest replied.
  4. In comparative clauses usually translated with the positive sense of the subsequent negative
    Apprendre le français est plus facile qu’on ne pense.
    Learning French is easier than you (might) think.

Usage notes

  • Typically, ne follows the subject and is itself followed by the verb and:
    • a negative adverbial (pas (not; don't/doesn't), plus (no more, no longer), jamais (never), guère (hardly), or (now literary) point (not a bit));
    • a nominal element modified by a negative determiner (aucun or nul, both meaning "no", "not a") — note that these phrases can take on nominal, pronominal or adverbial functions;
    • More mobile are negative pronouns, the most common being personne (nobody) and rien (nothing), which will follow ne and the verb if they function as the object complement of that verb, but if they are the subject of a given clause, they will usually sit at its head:
    Personne ne s’en souviendra demain.Nobody will remember about it tomorrow.
    Rien ne le dérange.Nothing bothers him.
  • In literary French (i.e., the most formal variety of the written language) certain verbs can be negated with ne alone (without another negating element like pas). Nowadays, this list is restricted chiefly to the verbs pouvoir, savoir, cesser, oser, and daigner. Less formal registers still require coordination with another negative element.
  • In colloquial (i.e., spoken) French, ne is often omitted, leaving the other negating element (pas, plus, rien, personne, etc.) to indicate the sentence's negative state on its own (unless more than one of these elements is already present).
    Je veux pas ça.I don't want that.
    Il attend personne.He's not waiting for anyone.
    J’en ai plus besoin.I don't need it anymore.
    On va nulle part.We're not going anywhere.
In some regions, ne has disappeared from spoken language either entirely or nearly so. Even when it is included in spoken form, the weak "e" is often elided, causing the remaining /n/ to assimilate into nearby words. Compare a few possible versions of the above example, Je veux pas ça, more or less rising in levels of formality:
J’ veux pas ça. /ʒ‿vø pɑ sa/
Je veux pas ça. /ʒə vø pɑ sa/
Je n’ veux pas ça. /ʒə̃ vø pɑ sa/
Je ne veux pas ça. /ʒə nə vø pɑ sa/, /ʒə‿n.vø pɑ sa/

See also

Further reading

Anagrams

German

Etymology 1

From Middle High German ne, ni (not, if not), from Old High German ne, ni (no, not, not at all, by no means), from Proto-West Germanic *ne, from Proto-Germanic *ne (not), from Proto-Indo-European *ne (not). Also possibly from a contraction of nicht, dialectal net, nit, ni.

Pronunciation

Particle

ne

  1. (colloquial, regional, Northern Germany, North Rhine-Westphalia) right?; is it?; is it not?; tag question
    Synonyms: gell, oder, wa; see also Thesaurus:nicht wahr
    Wir müssen da lang, ne?
    We need to go that way, don't we?
    Du hast keine Geschwister, ne?
    You don't have siblings, do you?

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

Interjection

ne

  1. Alternative spelling of nee

Etymology 3

Pronunciation

Article

ne

  1. Alternative spelling of 'ne

German Low German

Article

ne f

  1. (Paderbornisch) nominative/accusative feminine singular of en: a

Pronoun

ne m

  1. (Paderbornisch) weak accusative of hei: him

See also

Gothic

Romanization

  1. Romanization of 𐌽𐌴

Hungarian

Pronunciation

Adverb

ne

  1. don't, should/shall not, stop (doing something)
    Ne hallgass rá!Don't listen to him!
    Ne felejtsd el! or (more emphatically) El ne felejtsd!(Mind you) don't forget it!
    Miért ne? (= Miért ne csináljuk/tegyük?)Why not? (literally, “Why shouldn't ?”)
    Bár ne tettem volna!I wish I hadn't done it.
    Ne lopj!Thou shalt not steal.

Usage notes

Used before the verb in an imperative clause (or sometimes a conditional clause expressing a wish or desire) to negate that clause; ne is always used instead of nem in the imperative mood.

Derived terms

Compound words
Expressions

Further reading

  • ne in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Ido

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Esperanto ne, from French ne, Russian не (ne).

Adverb

ne

  1. not, don’t
Derived terms
  • ne- (non-, un-, in-, im-, ir- (etc.))

Etymology 2

From n +‎ -e.

Noun

ne (plural ne-i)

  1. The name of the Latin script letter N/n.
See also

Ingrian

Pronunciation

Pronoun

ne

  1. Alternative form of neet
    • 1936, L. G. Terehova, V. G. Erdeli, translated by Mihailov and P. I. Maksimov, Geografia: oppikirja iƶoroin alkușkoulun kolmatta klaassaa vart (ensimäine osa), Leningrad: Riikin Ucebno-Pedagogiceskoi Izdateljstva, page 6:
      Miltaisee poolee ne ollaa opettajast?
      On which side of the teacher are they?

Determiner

ne

  1. Alternative form of neet

References

  • Ruben E. Nirvi (1971) Inkeroismurteiden Sanakirja, Helsinki: Suomalais-Ugrilainen Seura, page 338

Anagrams

Isthmus Zapotec

Conjunction

ne

  1. and

Istro-Romanian

Etymology

From Latin nix, nivem, through Proto-Romanian (compare Romanian nea, Aromanian neao), from Proto-Italic *sniks, from Proto-Indo-European *snígʷʰs (snow), root noun derived from *sneygʷʰ- (to snow).

Noun

ne f (definite nevu, genitive/dative lu nevu)

  1. snow

Italian

Etymology 1

From Latin inde (thence). Compare French en (adverb, pronoun).

Alternative forms

  • -ne (enclitic form)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): °/ne/°
  • IPA(key): (traditional) /ne/°
  • Rhymes: -e
  • Hyphenation: ne
  • In modern usage but not traditional usage, this word actively blocks syntactic gemination of its initial consonant. Hence però ne prendo (I (will) take some) is pronounced /peˈrɔ ne ˈprɛndo/ in modern usage, but /peˈrɔ‿nne ˈprɛndo/ traditionally, since però normally triggers syntactic gemination.

Adverb

ne

  1. from there
    Si chiuse in casa e non ne uscì per giorni.
    He shut himself in the house, and didn't come out for days.
    (literally, “He locked himself in house, and didn't from there come out for days.”)
Usage notes
  • The adverb ne replaces di (from there):
Sono di Genova; ne sono venuto stamattina.
I am from Genoa; I came from there this morning.

Pronoun

ne

  1. from this; from that; from these; from those, sometimes not translated in English
    Furono mesi di lavoro sfibrante, ma ne venne fuori un gran film.
    There were months of exhausting work, but a great movie came out of those.
  2. about this; about that; about these; about those
    Ne abbiamo parlato, ma non sono sicuro che abbia capito.
    We talked about that, but I'm not sure he understood.
    Certo che ricordo quell'evento: ne ho perfino scritto in un articolo.
    Of course I remember that event, I even wrote an article about that
  3. of this; of that; of these; of those, sometimes not translated in English
    Se è avanzata della torta, ne vorrei una fetta, per favore.
    If there's some cake left, I would like a slice.
    (literally, “If is left some cake, of it I would like a slice.”)
    Avevi promesso di tornare a casa, te ne ricordi?
    You promised you'd come back home, do you remember (that)?
    (literally, “You had promised to come back to home, do you of it remember?”)
  4. of them (sometimes not translated in English)
    Non ne ho più.
    I don't have any left.
    (literally, “I don't of it have any more.”)
  5. for this; of that; of these; of those, sometimes not translated in English
    Ho capito cos'ha fatto, ma non ne ho capito il motivo.
    I understood what he did, but I didn't understand the reason for that.
  6. intensive particle, used in forms of certain verbs suffixed with -ne, where it indicates a particular way of carrying out the verb's action
    Spalancò la porta e se ne andò tutta esultante.
    She slammed the door open, and left all cheerful.
    Se ne sta sdraiato per ore a non fare nulla.
    He just stays there lying down for hours, without doing anything.
  7. only used in forms of the verb of volerne (to hold a grudge)
    Non te ne vorrò.
    I won't hold a grudge against you.
  8. only used in forms of the verb of andarne (to be at stake)
    Ne va della tua vita.
    Your life is at stake.
Usage notes
  • The pronoun ne stands for di + , and can thus be a translation of “ + it/them” for any preposition that is translated as di in Italian.
See also

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): °°/ne/*
  • Rhymes: -e
  • Hyphenation: ne
  • This word triggers syntactic gemination of the following consonant, and may or may not block syntactic gemination of its initial consonant (contrast the pronominal usage above).

Contraction

ne

  1. Apocopic form of nel
    Massimo Troisi non ha vinto un oscar per la sua interpretazione ne Il postino.
    Massimo Troisi did not win an Oscar for his performance in Il Postino.
Usage notes
  • The contraction ne is used where nel, nella, etc., would ordinarily be used, but cannot be because the article is part of the title of a film, book, etc.
See also

Further reading

  • ne1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  • ne2 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Japanese

Romanization

ne

  1. The hiragana syllable (ne) or the katakana syllable (ne) in Hepburn romanization.

Kalasha

Determiner

ne

  1. no

Particle

ne

  1. no

Kapampangan

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈne/
  • Hyphenation: ne

Etymology 1

Contraction of na + ya.

Pronoun

ne

  1. blend of 3rd person singular possessive/ergative pronoun + 3rd person singular absolutive pronoun
    Ikit ne.
    S/he saw him/her.

Etymology 2

Compare Tagalog 'no, Japanese (na), (ne).

Particle

ne

  1. (informal) sentence-final particle indicating emotion or mild emphasis
    Nokarin ya kaya ne?
    Now, I wonder where is s/he?
  2. (tag question) sentence-final question marker particle indicating emphasis and asking for confirmation: right?; eh?; isn't it, innit?
    Mako naku ne?
    I'm leaving, ok?

Adverb

ne

  1. already; now (expresses the event when following a verb)
    Yari ne.
    Finished already.
  2. already; now (declares the event of action when following a verb in the past tense)
    Meko ne.
    s/he left already.
  3. already; now (suggests immediate or quick action when following the infinitive form and future tense of the verb)
    Papunta ne kanu.
    s/he said that s/he's coming already.
See also

Karaim

Etymology

From Proto-Turkic *nē-

Pronoun

ne

  1. what

References

  • N. A. Baskakov, S.M. Šapšala, editor (1973), “ne”, in Karaimsko-Russko-Polʹskij Slovarʹ [Karaim-Russian-Polish Dictionary], Moscow: Moskva, →ISBN

Karelian

Regional variants of ne
North Karelian
(Viena)
ne
South Karelian
(Tver)
ne

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *nek. Cognates include Finnish ne and Estonian need.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈnʲe/
  • Hyphenation: ne

Determiner

ne

  1. (South Karelian) those
  2. (North Karelian or dialectal) these, those (medial)

Pronoun

ne

  1. (South Karelian) those
  2. (North Karelian or dialectal) these, those (medial)

Usage notes

  • In North Karelian, ne is used to refer to objects that are far away from the speaker, but close to the addressee.

Declension

Viena Karelian declension of ne (irregular)
singular plural
nominative še ne
genitive šen niijen
partitive šitä niitä
illative šiih niih
inessive šiinä niissä
elative šiitä niistä
adessive šillä niillä
ablative šiltä niiltä
translative šiksi niiksi
essive šinä niinä
comitative niineh
abessive šiittä niittä
Tver Karelian declension of ne (irregular)
singular plural
nominative še ne
genitive šen niijen
partitive šidä niidä
illative šiih niih
inessive šiinä niissä
elative šiitä niistä
adessive šillä niillä
ablative šildä niildä
translative šiksi niiksi
essive šinä niinä
comitative šiinke niinke
abessive šiittä niittä

See also

Karelian demonstratives
proximate medial distal
singular tämä še tuo
plural nämä ne nuo
In South Karelian, the medial determiners are used instead of the distal series.
Dialectally, the determiners are used as in North Karelian, distinguishing all three series.

References

  • A. V. Punzhina (1994) “ne”, in Словарь карельского языка (тверские говоры) [Dictionary of the Karelian language (Tver dialects)], →ISBN
  • P. Zaykov, L. Rugoyeva (1999) “ne”, in Карельско-Русский словарь (Северно-Карельские диалекты) [Karelian-Russian dictionary (North Karelian dialects)], Petrozavodsk, →ISBN
  • Pertti Virtaranta, Raija Koponen (2009) “ne”, in Marja Torikka, editor, Karjalan kielen sanakirja, Helsinki: Kotus, →ISSN

Ladin

Adverb

ne

  1. not

Latin

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Latin ne (not), from Proto-Italic *nē, from the extension of Proto-Indo-European *ne (not). Cognates include Proto-Germanic *ne (whence Gothic 𐌽𐌹 (ni) and Old English ne), Sanskrit (), Bulgarian, Serbo-Croatian and Russian не (ne), Lithuanian ne, Irish .

Adverb

(not comparable)

  1. no, not
  2. + subjunctive, introduces a prohibition or negative command: do not, don’t
  3. + future imperative, introduces a prohibition or negative command in general directions serving for all time, as precepts, statutes, and proverbs: do not, don’t
Derived terms

Conjunction

(+ subjunctive)

  1. that not, in order not to and similar; lest
    Vereor, videātur ōrātiō mea stulta.
    I fear lest my oration seem foolish.
Usage notes
  • Not to be confused with the affirmative particle ne (see Etymology 2).
  • The adverb, in cases of prohibition, became obsolete in colloquial speech in late antiquity, being displaced by non, originally a solecism.
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Proto-Indo-European *né-h₁ (that way, so), which consists of *áno- (yonder, pronomial stem, distal) +‎ *-h₁ (modal and instrumental suffix). Cognate with Ancient Greek νή (nḗ, yes, indeed) and Proto-Germanic *-nā (emphatic suffix after adverbs) which features in Icelandic svona (so), hérna (here), and þarna (there). The same pronominal stem is also present in the words enim (for; truly), nempe (indeed), and nam (for).

Interjection

  1. truly!, indeed!; only joined with personal pronouns and commonly connected with other affirmative particles
    • 44 BCE – 43 BCE, Cicero, Philippics :
      At enim te in disciplinam meam tradideras—nam ita dixisti—domum meam ventitaras. Ne tu, si id fecisses, melius famae, melius pudicitiae tuae consuluisses.
      You had however committed yourself to my instruction and frequented my house, or so you claimed. You would certainly have been more mindful of your virtue and reputation if you had!

References

  1. ^ Dunkel, George E. (2014) Lexikon der indogermanischen Partikeln und Pronominalstämme [Lexicon of Indo-European Particles and Pronominal Stems] (Indogermanische Bibliothek. 2. Reihe: Wörterbücher) (in German), volume 2: Lexikon, Heidelberg: Universitätsverlag Winter GmbH Heidelberg, →ISBN, pages 60, 62

Latvian

Etymology

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Pronunciation

This entry needs an audio pronunciation. If you are a native speaker with a microphone, please record this word. The recorded pronunciation will appear here when it's ready.

Conjunction

ne

  1. not
    ne tikainot only
    ne visainot quite

Lithuanian

Etymology

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Pronunciation

Interjection

ne

  1. no (used to show disagreement or negation)

Livonian

Pronunciation

Pronoun

ne

  1. they; nominative plural of tämā

Luganda

This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Luganda is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

Conjunction

ne

  1. and (only used if the overall statement is grammatically positive)

See also

References

The Essentials of Luganda, J. D. Chesswas, 4th edition. Oxford University Press: Nairobi. 1967, p. 94.

Mandarin

Pronunciation

Romanization

ne (ne5ne0, Zhuyin ˙ㄋㄜ)

  1. Hanyu Pinyin reading of
  2. Hanyu Pinyin reading of

ne

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .
  3. Nonstandard spelling of .
  4. Nonstandard spelling of nê̄.

Usage notes

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Mezquital Otomi

Etymology 1

From Proto-Otomi , from Proto-Otomian , from Proto-Oto-Pamean *neʔ.

Pronunciation

Verb

ne

  1. (trans) want

Etymology 2

From Proto-Otomi *ne, from Proto-Otomian *ne, from Proto-Oto-Pamean *te/*ne, from Proto-Oto-Manguean *(Y)te(H)³.

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

Noun

ne

  1. mouth
  2. snout
  3. edge (of a blade)
  4. bite, sting
  5. animals at the head of the herd

References

  • Andrews, Enriqueta (1950) Vocabulario otomí de Tasquillo, Hidalgo (in Spanish), México, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 19, 47, 74
  • Hernández Cruz, Luis, Victoria Torquemada, Moisés (2010) Diccionario del hñähñu (otomí) del Valle del Mezquital, estado de Hidalgo (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 45)‎ (in Spanish), second edition, Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 210

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch ne, from Proto-Germanic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Adverb

ne

  1. not

Usage notes

Immediately precedes the verb. Often found in combination with the synonymous niet or another negating adverb, which is placed elsewhere.

Alternative forms

Descendants

  • Dutch: n- (prefix)

Further reading

Middle English

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old English ne, from Proto-West Germanic *ne, from Proto-Germanic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Pronunciation

Adverb

ne

  1. not (negates the accompanying verb)
    Þei ne bileveden hire nought.They didn't believe her.
  2. not (to no degree, extent, or way)
    Þou ne art weyke.You aren't weak.

Usage notes

  • Middle English lacks do-support. Instead, ne is simply used by itself: Puple deien, bot fame ne deieþ ("People die, but reputation does not die").
  • Middle English has negative concord, so negatives don't cancel out another, unlike formal English or Latin. ne is often accompanied by other negatives rather than used alone. Double, triple, and quadruple negatives are common: I ne oght no man noght ("I haven't owed anything to anyone," literally "I not owed no one nothing").
  • ne usually immediately precedes the verb; compare nought / nat, which usually follows it.

Descendants

  • English: ne (obsolete)
  • Scots: ne (obsolete)

References

Conjunction

ne

  1. nor (and not, or (not), not)
  2. lest (in case, before)
  3. than (introducing a basis of comparison)

Usage notes

  • ne can contract with certain words that follow it, such as ne wasnas. This is optional, so forms like ne was are possible.
  • ne... ne... is often found in correlative constructions, with the meaning of not... or...; this is comparable to modern English neither... (n)or....

Descendants

  • English: ne (obsolete)
  • Scots: ne (obsolete)

References

Middle French

Etymology 1

Alternative forms

Adverb

ne

  1. not (used to negate a verb)
    • 1488, Jean Dupré, Lancelot du Lac, page 22:
      Ha ha pourdieu franc chevalier et preux ne me occisez mie
      Ha! For the love of God honest and valiant knight, don't kill me!
    • 1530, François Rabelais, Pantagruel:
      et ne m'advint oncques de mentir ou asseurer chose que ne feust veritable
      It never happened to me to lie or to assure someone of something that wasn't truthful
    • 1562, Henry IV of France, Lettres Missives:
      Catherine de Médicis, ne tarda pas à faire venir auprès de lui, en 1561, sa femme et ses enfants.
      Catherine of Medicis did not hesitate to bring to him, in 1561, his wife and his children
Usage notes
  • As in modern French, may be used in combination with another adverb, such as ne... iamais, ne... pas, ne... gaire, ne... mie, ne... oncques, ne... poin(c)t and ne... rien(s), but such an adverb is not required.

Etymology 2

See ny

Conjunction

ne

  1. Alternative form of ny (neither; nor)

Mohawk

Article

ne

  1. the

Negerhollands

Pronunciation

Verb

ne

  1. take

References

  • Language Contact in the Danish West Indies (2012, →ISBN

Nheengatu

Etymology

From Old Tupi ne. Cognate with Guaraní nde.

Pronunciation

This entry needs an audio pronunciation. If you are a native speaker with a microphone, please record this word. The recorded pronunciation will appear here when it's ready.
  • Hyphenation: ne
  • Rhymes: -e

Pronoun

ne

  1. (second-class) second-person singular personal pronoun (you, your)
    Ne akanhemu reikú nhaãsé ne kirá reikú.
    You are scared because you are fat.
    Aé uputari upitá ne irũmu.
    He wants to stay with you.
    Ne manha uwiké uka pisasú upé.
    Your mother enters the new house.

Usage notes

  • As a second-class pronoun, ne is used as the subject of a sentence when its verb is a second-class one (those verbs are sometimes referred to as adjectives). The personal pronoun ne is also used when governed by any postposition with the exception of arama and supé. Finally, ne is used as a possessive pronoun as well.

See also

Nheengatu personal pronouns
singular first-class pronoun second-class pronoun
first-person ixé se
second-person indé ne
third-person i
plural first-class pronoun second-class pronoun
first-person yandé yané
second-person penhẽ pe
third-person aintá (or ) aintá (or )

References

Northern Kurdish

Etymology

From Proto-Iranian *na, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *na, from Proto-Indo-European *ne. Related to na.

Adverb

ne

  1. not
    Ez ne kurd im.
    I'm not Kurdish.

Interjection

ne

  1. no

Northern Ndebele

Etymology

From Proto-Bantu *-nàì.

Adjective

-ne

  1. four

Inflection

Adjective concord, tone L
Modifier Copulative
1st singular engimune ngimune
2nd singular omune umune
1st plural esibane sibane
2nd plural elibane libane
Class 1 omune mune
Class 2 abane bane
Class 3 omune mune
Class 4 emine mine
Class 5 eline line
Class 6 amane mane
Class 7 esine sine
Class 8 ezine zine
Class 9 ene ine
Class 10 ezine zine
Class 11 olune lune
Class 14 obune bune
Class 15 okune kune
Class 17 okune kune

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old Norse nið f, possibly from Proto-Germanic *nidwō (sinking; downfall).

Pronunciation

Noun

ne n (plural neet)

  1. a lunar phase of an old moon, i.e. period of time in which the moon is waning
    Antonym: ny

Derived terms

References

Anagrams

Old Czech

Etymology

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *ne, from Proto-Slavic *ne, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Pronunciation

Particle

ne

  1. Negation particle; no, not

Descendants

References

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *ne (not).

Pronunciation

Adverb

ne

  1. not

Usage notes

  • Old English does not have do-support. Instead, ne is simply used by itself: Menn sweltaþ, ac hlīsa ne swilt ("People die, but reputation does not die").
  • Ne is placed immediately before the finite verb: Sēo lǣrestre ne meahte furðum mīnes naman ġemunan (“The teacher could not even remember my name”). It only goes before infinitives on the rare occasion when there is no finite verb to negate: Iċ wēne þæt þū sċyle forlǣtan and eft ne cuman ("I think you should leave and not come back"), Uton ne forspillan nāne tīd mā ("Let's not waste any more time").
  • Ne negates verbs. Other parts of speech are negated with : Earg iċ eom, nā lǣwa ("I'm a coward, not a traitor"), Iċ hīe fræġn "Hū wæs þīn færeld?" and hēo cwæþ "Nā yfel" ("I asked her 'How was your trip?' and she said "Not bad'"). is also used when the verb is only implied: Ne rēċe iċ hwæðer mē hwā ġelīefe þē nā ("I don't care if anyone believes me or not"). also negates tō-infinitives and participles: Þās þing ġedafenode tō dōnne and þā ōðru nā tō forlǣtenne ("It would have made sense to do these things and not to neglect the others").
  • Ne and its accompanying verb often come at the beginning of a sentence: Ne meahte nān mann tecnāwan hwelcre mægðe hē wǣre ("Nobody could tell what tribe he was," literally "Couldn't nobody tell what tribe he was").
  • Old English has negative concord, meaning one negative does not cancel out another. Double, triple, and quadruple negatives are very common: Ne sċolde iċ nǣfre nānum menn nāwiht ("I've never owed anything to anyone," literally "I never not owed no one nothing").
  • In a few verbs beginning with a vowel, h, or w, ne actually fuses with the verb, creating nesan (to not be), nabban (to not have), nyllan (to not want), nytan (to not know), and nāgan (to not own). In the West Saxon dialect (the dialect of most surviving texts and sometimes referred to as "standard" Old English), the contracted forms are the norm, while in other dialects the uncontracted forms ne wesan, ne habban, etc. are also common.

Conjunction

ne

  1. (in negative phrases) or, and not (optionally translated as "nor")
    Þurh þissa þinga ġehāt sind cumene tō anwealde unmenn. Ac hīe lēogaþ, ne ġelǣstaþ hīe þæt ġehāt, ne hīe nǣfre nyllaþ!
    By the promise of these things, brutes have risen to power. But they lie, they do not fulfill that promise, and they never will!
    • c. 996, Ælfric's Lives of Saints
      Sē enġel him cwæþ tō, "Ne cyss þū mīne fēt, ne þū mē ne hrepe."
      The angel said to him, "Don't kiss my feet, and don't touch me."
    • late 9th century, King Alfred's translation of The Consolation of Philosophy
      Nān mann hine ne cann, ne hē nānne mann ne furðum þæt ġeþēode.
      No one knows him, and he doesn't know anyone or even the language.
  2. ne... ne... is used to mean " or..." (optionally translated as "neither... nor...")
    Iċ næbbe ne frīend ne fīend. Wrace iċ hæbbe.
    I don't have friends or enemies. I have revenge.

Usage notes

  • In the phrase " or...", ne is often used consecutively for "or": Iċ nāt ne ne rēċe hwelċes cynnes fugol hit sīe, hit is mīn frēond ("I don't know or care what kind of bird it is, it's my friend").

Descendants

  • Middle English: ne, ny, ni (rare)
    • English: ne (obsolete)
    • Scots: ne (obsolete)

Old French

Etymology 1

From Latin nōn.

Alternative forms

  • nen (poetic, after vowels)

Adverb

ne

  1. not; used to form negative constructions
Descendants
  • French: ne

Etymology 2

From Latin nec.

Conjunction

ne

  1. neither (not one or the other)
Descendants
  • French: ni

Old Frisian

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *ne (not). Cognates include Old English ne and Old Saxon ne.

Pronunciation

Adverb

ne

  1. not

Descendants

  • North Frisian:
    Heligoland: ni

Conjunction

ne

  1. nor

Particle

ne

  1. no

Synonyms

References

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN

Old Saxon

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *ne.

Adverb

ne

  1. not

Descendants

  • Middle Low German: ne, en

Old Tupi

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈnɛ/
  • Rhymes:
  • Hyphenation: ne

Pronoun

ne

  1. Alternative form of nde

Pali

Alternative forms

Adjective

ne

  1. accusative plural masculine of na (those)

Pronoun

ne

  1. accusative plural of na (them, those)

Phuthi

Etymology

From Proto-Bantu *-nàì.

Adjective

-ne

  1. four

Inflection

Adjective concord, tone L
Modifier Copulative
1st singular legimune gimune
2nd singular lomune umune
1st plural lesibane sibane
2nd plural lelibane libane
Class 1 lamune mhune
Class 2 labane bhane
Class 3 lomune mhune
Class 4 lemine mhine
Class 5 leline lhine
Class 6 lamane mhane
Class 7 lesine ssine
Class 8 letine ttine
Class 9 lene yhine
Class 10 letine ttine
Class 14 lobune bhune
Class 15 lokune kkune
Class 17 lokune kkune

Rawang

Noun

ne

  1. eye.

Romanian

Alternative forms

  • нє (pre-1860s Cyrillic form)

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin nīs, from Latin nos. Compare (old form) and Aromanian .

Pronunciation

Pronoun

ne (unstressed accusative and reflexive form of noi)

  1. (direct object, first-person plural) us
    El ne urmează.
    He's following us.
  • noi (stressed accusative)

Pronoun

ne (unstressed dative and reflexive form of noi)

  1. (indirect object) (to) us
    Ele ne dau cadouri.
    They give us presents.

See also

Saterland Frisian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nə/
  • Hyphenation: ne

Article

ne

  1. Form of of n used before feminine adjectives
    Dät is n Gous. Ne grieze Gous.That's a goose. A grey goose.

Scots

Etymology

From Middle English ne, from Old English ne, from Proto-Germanic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /neɪ/, /nɛ/, /nə/, /n(ː)/

Adverb

ne

  1. (archaic, rare) Not.
    Ne look at the sky, when ye tread bumpy roads.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
    (A Northern English folk saying)

Conjunction

ne

  1. (archaic, rare) Nor.
    Ne mother, ne father, ne friends, ne foes ne-knew what had worthen of him.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

Usage notes

  • Ne is a negative particle and it is used preverbally, i.e. it is placed directly before a verb, for example,ː"What haps might chance me I ne knew" (William Fowler (makar), 1590) and "To suffer exile he said that he ne couth" (Gavin Douglas, Virgil's Aeneid, 1513). Now archaic and chiefly dialectal, it is still understood and used by a few rural speakers in Scotland and Northern England.
  • As a conjunction, it is placed immediately before the word it negates as inː ne mickle, ne little; Twas ne man, ne woman.. ne beast; ne rich, ne poor, ne bold, ne meek, ne stong, ne weak can escape God's wrath.
  • In urban areas and cities became displaced by na or nae.

Further reading

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *ne, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Pronunciation

Particle

ne (Cyrillic spelling не)

  1. not (denoting negation)
    ne znamI don't know
    on je ne samo darovit, već i jako marljivhe is not only talented, but also very industrious
    htio-ne htiowhether you want it or not
    da ne spavaš? / ne spavaš li? / zar ne spavaš?aren't you sleeping?
    ne mogu, a da ne…I cannot but…
    reći neto say no; refuse, decline
    ne manje nego/od…no less than…
    ne doćito fail to come, not come
    … Zar ne?… Aren't you? (Isn't it?, Do you?, Don't you?)
    nećuI won't

Interjection

ne (Cyrillic spelling не)

  1. no
    Jesi li demokrat? Ne!Are you a democrat? No!

Synonyms

  • jok (dialectal)

Antonyms

Slovene

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Pronunciation

Particle

  1. not (negates meaning of verb)
  2. no (expresses disapproval, disagreement)

Antonyms

  • (antonym(s) of no): ,

Further reading

  • ne”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Southern Ndebele

Etymology

From Proto-Bantu *-nàì.

Adjective

-ne

  1. four

Inflection

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Sumerian

Romanization

ne

  1. Romanization of 𒉈

Swazi

Etymology

From Proto-Bantu *-nàì.

Adjective

-ne

  1. four

Inflection

Adjective concord, tone L
Modifier Copulative
1st singular lengimune ngimune
2nd singular lomune umune
1st plural lesibane sibane
2nd plural lenibane nibane
Class 1 lomune mune
Class 2 labane bane
Class 3 lomune mune
Class 4 lemine mine
Class 5 leline line
Class 6 lamane mane
Class 7 lesine sine
Class 8 letine tine
Class 9 lene ine
Class 10 letine tine
Class 11 lolune lune
Class 14 lobune bune
Class 15 lokune kune
Class 17 lokune kune

Tagalog

Alternative forms

Etymology

Compare Ilocano ne, Kapampangan ne, and Japanese (ne).

Pronunciation

Particle

ne (Baybayin spelling ᜈᜒ)

  1. (Bataan, Nueva Ecija, tag question) Sentence-final question marker particle indicating emphasis and asking for confirmation: right?; eh?; isn't it, innit?
    Synonyms: 'no, 'di ba, ano, (Rizal) hane
    Tapos magkikita tayo sa bahay ni Aling Neneng, ne?
    Afterwards, we'll see each other at Ms. Neneng's house, am I right?
    Maligo ka na, ne?
    Take a bath, alright?

Anagrams

Ternate

Pronunciation

Determiner

ne

  1. (proximal) this, these
    namo nethis chicken

Pronoun

ne

  1. (demonstrative) this
    ngori tomau neI want this
    ne fokethis is a cockroach

References

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh

Turkish

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Ottoman Turkish نه (ne, what, whatever, how), from Old Anatolian Turkish (ne, what), from Proto-Turkic *nē- (what).

Cognate with Old Turkic 𐰤𐰀 (n²a /⁠ne⁠/, what, which), Karakhanid نا (ne), Old Uyghur (ne), Azerbaijani , Salar neñ, Bashkir ни (ni), Chuvash мӗн (mĕn) (metathesis < *ne-me), Kazakh не (ne), Khakas ниме (nime), Kyrgyz не (ne), Tatar ни (ni), Turkmen nǟmä, Tuvan чүү (çüü), Uyghur نېمە (nëme), Uzbek nima, Yakut туох (tuoq).

Pronoun

ne

  1. what
    Ne istiyorsun?What do you want?
  2. whatever
    Ne istersen yaparım.I will do whatever you want.
Declension
Inflection
Nominative ne
Definite accusative neyi
Singular Plural
Nominative ne neler
Definite accusative neyi neleri
Dative neye nelere
Locative nede nelerde
Ablative neden nelerden
Genitive neyin nelerin
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular neyim nelerim
2nd singular neyin nelerin
3rd singular neyi neleri
1st plural neyimiz nelerimiz
2nd plural neyiniz neleriniz
3rd plural neleri neleri
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular neyimi nelerimi
2nd singular neyini nelerini
3rd singular neyini nelerini
1st plural neyimizi nelerimizi
2nd plural neyinizi nelerinizi
3rd plural nelerini nelerini
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular neyime nelerime
2nd singular neyine nelerine
3rd singular neyine nelerine
1st plural neyimize nelerimize
2nd plural neyinize nelerinize
3rd plural nelerine nelerine
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular neyimde nelerimde
2nd singular neyinde nelerinde
3rd singular neyinde nelerinde
1st plural neyimizde nelerimizde
2nd plural neyinizde nelerinizde
3rd plural nelerinde nelerinde
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular neyimden nelerimden
2nd singular neyinden nelerinden
3rd singular neyinden nelerinden
1st plural neyimizden nelerimizden
2nd plural neyinizden nelerinizden
3rd plural nelerinden nelerinden
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular neyimin nelerimin
2nd singular neyinin nelerinin
3rd singular neyinin nelerinin
1st plural neyimizin nelerimizin
2nd plural neyinizin nelerinizin
3rd plural nelerinin nelerinin
Predicative forms
Singular Plural
1st singular neyim nelerim
2nd singular nesin nelersin
3rd singular ne
nedir
neler
nelerdir
1st plural neyiz neleriz
2nd plural nesiniz nelersiniz
3rd plural neler nelerdir

Adverb

ne

  1. what, how, such
    Ne güzel!How beautiful!
    Ne güzel bir gün!What a beautiful day!
  2. Used as an intensifier to express surprise, astonishment, together with expressions like be!, ha!.
    Ne osurdun be!You farted such (that probably the whole world heard it).

Etymology 2

From Ottoman Turkish نه (ne, neither; nor), from Persian نه (na). Cognate to Old English ne (not).

Conjunction

ne ... ne ...

  1. neither; nor
    Ne bu ne şuNeither this nor that
Usage notes
  • Not used alone but rather as ne...ne..., the way it is used is directly copied from Persian نه...نه...(“neither; nor”).
Antonyms

Etymology 3

Noun

ne

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter N/n.

See also

References

  1. ^ Starostin, Sergei, Dybo, Anna, Mudrak, Oleg (2003) “*nē-”, in Etymological dictionary of the Altaic languages (Handbuch der Orientalistik; VIII.8), Leiden, New York, Köln: E.J. Brill

Tuvaluan

Particle

ne

  1. past tense marker, inserted immediately before the relevant verb

Unami

Pronunciation

Pronoun

  1. that (inanimate)

See also

Ura (Vanuatu)

Pronunciation

Noun

ne

  1. water
  2. river

Further reading

  • Terry Crowley, Ura: A Disappearing Language of Southern Vanuatu (1999)

Votic

Pronunciation

  • (Luutsa, Liivtšülä) IPA(key): /ˈne/,
  • Rhymes: -e
  • Hyphenation: ne

Pronoun

ne

  1. Alternative form of need

Welsh

Pronunciation

Noun

ne

  1. Nasal mutation of de.

Mutation

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
de dde ne unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

West Makian

Etymology

Likely cognate with Ternate ne (this).

Pronunciation

Determiner

ne

  1. (proximal) this, these
    Synonyms: mene, nema
    Antonym: ma
    pala ne ilamothis house is large
    nudupe de ngeu nethrow away these leftovers

References

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours, Pacific linguistics

Xhosa

Etymology

From Proto-Bantu *-nàì.

Adjective

-ne

  1. four

Inflection

Adjective concord, tone L
Modifier Copulative
positive negative positive negative
1st singular endimne endingemne ndimne andimne
2nd singular omne ongemne umne awumne
1st plural esibane esingebane sibane asibane
2nd plural enibane eningebane nibane anibane
Class 1 omne ongemne mne akamne
Class 2 abane abangebane bane ababane
Class 3 omne ongemne mne awumne
Class 4 emine engemine mine ayimine
Class 5 eline elingeline line aliline
Class 6 amane angemane mane awamane
Class 7 esine esingesine sine asisine
Class 8 ezine ezingezine zine azizine
Class 9 ene engene ine ayiyine
Class 10 ezine ezingezine zine azizine
Class 11 olune olungelune lune alulune
Class 14 obune obungebune bune abubune
Class 15 okune okungekune kune akukune
Class 17 okune okungekune kune akukune

Yup'ik

Noun

ne (absolutive ena)

  1. house

Zou

Pronunciation

Noun

ne

  1. lip

Verb

ne

  1. (transitive) to eat

Derived terms

References

  • Lukram Himmat Singh (2013) A Descriptive Grammar of Zou, Canchipur: Manipur University, pages 40-41

Zulu

Etymology

From Proto-Bantu *-nàì.

Adjective

-ne

  1. four

Inflection

Adjective concord, tone L
Modifier Copulative
positive negative positive negative
1st singular engimune engingemune ngimune angimune
2nd singular omune ongemune umune awumune
1st plural esibane esingebane sibane asibane
2nd plural enibane eningebane nibane anibane
Class 1 omune ongemune mune akamune
Class 2 abane abangebane bane ababane
Class 3 omune ongemune mune awumune
Class 4 emine engemine mine ayimine
Class 5 eline elingeline line aliline
Class 6 amane angemane mane awamane
Class 7 esine esingesine sine asisine
Class 8 ezine ezingezine zine azizine
Class 9 ene engene, engeyine ine, yine ayiyine
Class 10 ezine ezingezine zine azizine
Class 11 olune olungelune lune alulune
Class 14 obune obungebune bune abubune
Class 15 okune okungekune kune akukune
Class 17 okune okungekune kune akukune

Derived terms

References