van

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English

A van (motor vehicle).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: văn, IPA(key): /væn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æn

Etymology 1

Short for caravan.

Noun

van (plural vans)

  1. A covered motor vehicle used to carry goods or (normally less than ten) persons, usually roughly cuboid in shape, Depending on the type of van, it can be bigger or smaller than a pickup truck and SUV, and longer and higher than a car but relatively smaller than a truck/lorry or a bus.
    Synonyms: (chiefly if used to carry a few people; "minivan" is officially used in North America) minivan, minibus
    The van sped down the road.
  2. (British) An enclosed railway vehicle for transport of goods, such as a boxcar/box van.
  3. (dated) A light wagon, either covered or open, used by tradesmen and others for the transportation of goods.
  4. (aerospace) A large towable vehicle equipped for the repair of structures that cannot easily be moved.
    • 1959, Western Aerospace, volume 39, page 46:
      Designed to be fully mobile and self-contained, the complete equipment includes an air-conditioned van containing all necessary electronic gear and a flat bed trailer in which missiles, jet engines and other large assemblies may be cleaned.
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb

van (third-person singular simple present vans, present participle vanning, simple past and past participle vanned)

  1. (transitive) To transport in a van or similar vehicle (especially of horses).
    • 1966, United States Congress, Senate, Committee on Commerce, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      I have to have a license to own them, a license to train them, my jockey has to have a license to ride them, the van company must have a license to van them, and the black shoe man must have a license to shoe them.
    • 1999, Bonnie Bryant, Changing Leads, page 53:
      [They] had their own horses, but they hadn't bothered to van them over to Pine Hollow for this outing.
  2. (Internet slang, used in passive voice) Of law enforcement: to arrest (not necessarily in a van; derived from party van).
    • 2011, The hackers hacked: main Anonymous IRC servers invaded:
      One Anon explained the reason for this, saying: "As for the domains, they were transferred to Ryan after some of us got vanned so he can keep the network up. What he did certainly wasn't the plan." (Getting "vanned" refers to getting picked up by the police.)
    • 2012, FBI names, arrests Anon who infiltrated its secret conference call:
      He later told CW that he had been "v&" or "vanned" by the police, and he expressed surprise that the police showed him detailed transcripts of his conversations.
    • 2013, Redditor Confesses to Murder with Meme, Gets Doxed by Other Redditors, Deletes His Account and Disappears:
      But not before someone supposedly forwarded all the information onto the FBI. In a last-ditch effort to avoid getting "vanned," Naratto tried to put the memie back in the bottle
    • 2015 13-year-old credited with hacking CIA director’s AOL account gives bizarre, possibly final interview
      The hacker says he thinks he is about to be v&, or “vanned,” meaning being raided by law enforcement, sometime soon.
    • 2016, Teen Allegedly Behind CIA, FBI Breaches: 'They're Trying to Ruin My Life.':
      On Wednesday night, Motherboard spoke to the teenager accused of being Cracka. "I got fucking v&," he told Motherboard, using "v&," the slang for "vanned," or getting arrested. (At this point, the arrest had not been made public.)
    • 2017, Dark Ops: An Anonymous Story, page 8:
      Commander X: Yep, so now you all know how I got vanned. And you just met the snitch who did it to me.
Derived terms

See also

Etymology 2

Shortening of vanguard.

Noun

van (plural vans)

  1. Clipping of vanguard.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, book 5, lines 588–590:
      Ten thousand thousand Ensignes high advanc'd, / Standards, and Gonfalons twixt Van and Reare / Streame in the Aire, and for distinction serve
    • 1698, Ned Ward, The London Spy:
      Then a bumper to the Queen led the van of our good wishes, another to the Church Established, a third was left to the whim of the toaster []
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, volumes (please specify |volume=I to VI), London: A Millar, , →OCLC:
      As for the guides, they were debarred from the pleasure of discourse, the one being placed in the van, and the other obliged to bring up the rear.
    • 1897 December (indicated as 1898), Winston Churchill, chapter V, in The Celebrity: An Episode, New York, N.Y.: The Macmillan Company; London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., →OCLC:
      We expressed our readiness, and in ten minutes were in the station wagon, rolling rapidly down the long drive, for it was then after nine. We passed on the way the van of the guests from Asquith.
    • 1965, “Virāṭa Parva”, in Chakravarthi V. Narasimhan, transl., The Mahābhārata, book 4, translation of original in Sanskrit, section 33, page 84:
      Bhīṣma then outlined the following strategy: “… Let Karṇa, clad in armour, stand in the van. And I shall command the entire army in the rear.”

Etymology 3

From Cornish.

Noun

van (plural vans)

  1. (mining) A shovel used in cleansing ore.

Verb

van (third-person singular simple present vans, present participle vanning, simple past and past participle vanned)

  1. (mining) To wash or cleanse, as a small portion of ore, on a shovel.
Derived terms

Etymology 4

From Latin vannus (a van, or fan for winnowing grain): compare French van and English fan, winnow. Doublet of fan.

Noun

van (plural vans)

  1. A fan or other contrivance, such as a sieve, for winnowing grain.
  2. A wing with which the air is beaten.
Related terms

References

  1. ^ Rossiter W[orthington] Raymond (1881) “Van”, in A Glossary of Mining and Metallurgical Terms. , Easton, Pa.: Institute , , →OCLC.

Anagrams

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch van (from; of).

Pronunciation

Preposition

van

  1. of
  2. from

See also

Particle

van

  1. (used with a following definite article) some of (the)
    Van die wêreld se beste wyne kom van hierdie streek af.
    Some of the world’s best wines are from this region.
    Ons het met van die belangrikste politieke leiers gespreek.
    We have spoken to some of the most important political leaders.

Antillean Creole

Etymology

From French vent.

Noun

van

  1. air
  2. wind
  3. breath
  4. intestinal gas

Catalan

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

Verb

van

  1. third-person plural present indicative of anar
    Van al cinema.They go to the cinema.
  2. (auxiliary, with infinitive) third-person plural present indicative of anar
    Van anar al cinema.They went to the cinema.

Chinese

Alternative forms

Etymology

From English van.

Pronunciation


Noun

van

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese, often in compounds) van; minibus; vehicle (Classifier: c)

Derived terms

Czech

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Noun

van m inan

  1. (archaic, poetic) breeze (light, gentle wind)
Declension
Related terms

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

van f

  1. genitive plural of vana

Further reading

  • van in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • van in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • van in Internetová jazyková příručka

Danish

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology 1

From Old Norse vanr (pl vanir (one of two groups of gods in Norse mythology)).

Pronunciation

Noun

van c (singular definite vanen, plural indefinite vaner)

  1. one of the Vanir
Inflection

Etymology 2

From English van.

Pronunciation

Noun

van c (singular definite vanen, plural indefinite vaner)

  1. van
Inflection

Etymology 3

From Old Norse vanr (wont, accustomed).

Pronunciation

Adverb

van

  1. (dated) pleje van – nurse, take care of
Usage notes

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch van, from Old Dutch fan (from), from Proto-Germanic *fanē, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂poneh₁ (from), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂epo, *h₂pó (off, of). Cognate with Old Saxon fana, fan (from), Old Frisian fan, fon (from), Old High German fona, fon (from).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vɑn/
  • (Northern)
  • (Suriname)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: van
  • Rhymes: -ɑn

Preposition

van

  1. of (possession, property)
    de hoed van het meisje
    the hat of the girl
    het gewicht van een olifant
    the weight of an elephant
  2. of (general association)
    Zij was van adel.
    She was of noble stock.
    een stad van één miljoen inwoners
    a city of one million inhabitants
    Hij is een man van eer.
    He's a man of honour.
    Dat is hier niet van toepassing.
    That's not applicable here.
    de trein van tien uur
    the train of ten o'clock
  3. by, of (creator)
    een schilderij van Rubens
    a painting by Rubens
    een plaat van de Beatles
    a record of the Beatles
  4. from (origin)
    Hij komt van Griekenland.
    He's from Greece.
  5. from (starting point of a movement or change)
    Hij ging van deur tot deur.
    He went from door to door.
    van vader op zoon.
    from father to son.
  6. from (starting point in time)
    van toen af aan.
    from then onwards
    van 's avonds laat tot 's morgens vroeg
    from late at night till the early morning
    van dag tot dag
    from day to day
  7. from, off (removal of something from off something else)
    het vlees van de beenderen snijden.
    to cut the meat from the bones
  8. of, out of, from, with (cause)
    sidderen van angst
    to tremble with fear
    tranen van geluk
    tears of joy
  9. of, out of, with (material or resource)
    Deze tafel is gemaakt van hout.
    This table is made (out) of wood.
    Van dit geld kan ik een basgitaar kopen.
    With this money I'm able to buy a bass.
  10. of, out of, among (out of a larger whole; partitive)
    de jongste van zijn dochters
    the youngest of his daughters
    Van alle mensen ben ik de mooiste.
    Out of all people I am the most beautiful.
    Drink niet te veel van dat bier, het is erg sterk.
    Don't drink too much of that beer, it is very strong.
  11. from, was, formerly (indicating a change in price)
    van 5 €, voor 3 €
    was €5, now €3
  12. (colloquial) like (quotative (used to introduce direct speech))
    Ik dacht van hé wat gek. — I thought, hey, how strange.

Inflection

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: van
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: fan
  • Javindo: fan
  • Jersey Dutch: vān, fān, f'n
  • Negerhollands: van, fan, fa
    • Virgin Islands Creole: fam
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: fan

Adverb

van

  1. of, from
    Ik neem er tien van. — I’ll take ten of them.
  2. from
    Ik vertrek van daar. — I’ll start from there.
  3. by, from
    Ik word er gek van. — It drives me crazy.
    Men wordt daar sloom van. — It turns one numb.
  4. of, about
    Wat zegt u daar van? — What do you say about that?
    Ik weet daar niks van. — I don’t know anything about that.

Derived terms

Noun

van m (plural vans or vannen)

  1. A surname or nickname beginning with the preposition van.
  2. Any surname.
    Synonyms: achternaam, familienaam

See also

French

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Latin vannus

Noun

van m (plural vans)

  1. a winnowing basket

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English van.

Noun

van m (plural vans)

  1. a horse trailer
    • Adolphe de Neuter, Mémoires d'un entraîneur, volume 1: La casaque rose, Paris: Imprimerie Kapp, 1925, p. 145
      C’est à l’occasion du Saint-Léger gagné par Elis que l’on usa pour la première fois d’un van comme mode de locomotion pour les chevaux. Ce fut l’occasion d’un coup monstre.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
      ils leur ont montré comment faire monter un cheval dans un van, le lâcher, effectuer les premiers soins de sauvetage avant l’arrivée du vétérinaire.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)

Further reading

Galician

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old Galician-Portuguese vão (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from Latin vānus (empty). Cognate with Portuguese vão and Spanish vano.

Adjective

van (feminine va, masculine plural vans, feminine plural vas)

  1. empty, devoid of content, containing only air
  2. useless, ineffective
  3. (of a person) vacuous, trivial-minded

Noun

van m (plural vans)

  1. waist
  2. empty, vacant

Derived terms

Verb

van

  1. third-person plural present indicative of ir

References

  • vão” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • vão” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • van” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • van” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • van” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Gallo

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

van m (plural vans)

  1. (agriculture) winnowing machine

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French vent (wind).

Pronunciation

Noun

van

  1. wind

Hungarian

Etymology

From Old Hungarian vagyon. See Hungarian volt.

Pronunciation

Verb

van

  1. (copulative) to be
    Antonym: nem
    Boldog vagyok.I am happy.
  2. there to be, to exist
    Synonyms: létezik, található
    Antonym: nincs
    Van itt valaki?Is there anybody here?
  3. to have; someone (-nak/-nek) has something (-a/-e/-ja/-je)
    Péternek van egy kutyája.Peter has a dog.
  4. to be made (out) of something (with -ból/-ből)
    Synonym: készült
    Ez az ajtó fából van.This door is made out of wood.
  5. (auxiliary, construed with -va/-ve (adverbial participle) of the main verb) to be (indicating the statal passive)
    A lakásom biztosítva van. (from biztosítvabiztosít)My apartment (flat) is (has been) insured.
    A probléma meg van oldva. (from megoldvamegold)The issue is (has been) solved.
    • 1846, János Arany, translated by Anton N. Nyerges, Toldi, canto 6, stanza 13:
      „Szakmány módra van rám mérve minden óra: / Jöttem kegyelmedhez búcsuvevő szóra.”
      “Every hour is measured as though by contract. / I come to bid you now farewell.”

Usage notes

The functions of this verb don’t fully overlap with the usage of corresponding verbs of other languages (compare Spanish ser, estar or Thai คือ (kʉʉ), เป็น (bpen), อยู่ (yùu)):

  • Van egy törpe a zsebemben.   or   Törpe van a zsebemben.There is a dwarf in my pocket.existence (used with an indefinite subject)
  • [Nekem] van egy zsebtörpém.I have a pocket-dwarf. (literally, “ there is a pocket-dwarf-my”)possession
  • A törpe a zsebemben van.The dwarf is in my pocket.location (used with a prepositional phrase in English)
  • A törpe jól van.The dwarf is well.state, condition (used with an adverb in English)
  • A törpe kicsi .The dwarf is small.copula (used with an adjective or a noun as part of the predicate)
  • As we can see, the verb is omitted in the last sentence. It happens only in the given sense and only in the present-tense third-person singular and plural forms (“he/she/it” and “they”):
    When used with an adjective (qualification) or a noun (whether with the definite or the indefinite article), i.e. when it answers the question who? or what? (including what …… like?) or which?, the (indicative present third-person) forms van and vannak are omitted:
    Béla okos.Béla is clever.
    Béla a király.Béla is the king.
    Béla egy ember.Béla is a human.
    On the other hand, if is or are answers the question where? or how?, these verb forms will appear as usual:
    Béla itt van.Béla is here.
    Béla jól van.Béla is (feeling) well.
    It also appears if van/vannak is the focus of the sentence. This happens when the sentence means that the property described by the adjective (e.g. strength) reaches or exceeds some specified level and this is emphasized by the speaker. In this case, the adjective is preceded by a word like olyan (such), annyira (that much), elég (enough).
    Béla van annyira erős, hogy felemelje a szekrényt.Béla is strong enough to lift the cupboard.
    The forms other than van and vannak are always used.
    Béla okos volt.Béla was clever.
    Okos vagyok.I am clever.
    In other senses, all forms are used:
    With adverbs and adverbial participles (suffixed -va/-ve)
    Hogy van?How is he? (also How are you?, formal singular)
    El van törve.It is broken.
  • The negative form is nincs or nincsen and sincs or sincsen (the latter two expressing “is not … either”).
    Nincs pénzem.I don't have any money.
    Itt sincs étel.There 'isn’t any food here either.
  • If the predicate includes an adjective or a noun, that is, if it answers the question who, what etc. (see above), the third person present forms are omitted again, only nem remains:
    Béla nem tanár.Béla is not a teacher.

(exist, there is, to have): (have is expressed by there is in Hungarian):

  • Van egy ház a hegyen.There is a house on the mountain.
    Van egy kutyám.I have a dog. (literally, “There is a dog--mine.”)

Conjugation

Derived terms

(With verbal prefixes):

Expressions with a locative (or adverbial) sense
Expressions with the possessive sense
Expressions with a locative form of its possessive
Expressions with the sense ‘there is’

Further reading

  • (all verb senses): van in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • ( synonym of the noun vagyon): van in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Iban

Etymology

Borrowed from English van.

Pronunciation

Noun

van

  1. van

Interlingua

Adjective

van (comparative plus van, superlative le plus van)

  1. vain, futile
  2. vain, worthless
  3. vain, conceited

Italian

Adjective

van (apocopated)

  1. Apocopic form of vano

Manx

Etymology

Borrowed from English van.

Noun

van f (genitive singular van, plural vannyn)

  1. van (vehicle)

Synonyms

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch fan, from Proto-Germanic *fanē.

Preposition

van

  1. of
  2. from (a place, person)
  3. from (a time)
  4. out of
  5. from, out of, because of

Descendants

Further reading

Mòcheno

Contraction

van

  1. va + an, from a, of a

References

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Old Norse vanr.

Adjective

van (neuter vant, definite singular and plural vane)

  1. being used to (doing) something
Related terms

Etymology 2

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

From Old Norse vanr m.

Noun

van m (definite singular vanen, indefinite plural vaner or vanar, definite plural vanene or vanane)

  1. (Norse mythology) one of the Vanir

Etymology 3

Borrowed from Dutch van (of, from), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *fanē. Doublet of von.

Preposition

van

  1. Used in Dutch surnames.

References

Anagrams

Polish

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl
van

Alternative forms

Etymology

Unadapted borrowing from English van.

Pronunciation

Noun

van m inan

  1. van (covered motor vehicle used to carry goods or (normally less than ten) persons, usually roughly cuboid in shape, longer and higher than a car but relatively smaller than a truck/lorry or a bus)
    Synonym: pojazd wielozadaniowy
    Hyponym: minivan

Declension

Further reading

  • van in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • van in Polish dictionaries at PWN
  • van in PWN's encyclopedia

Portuguese

Alternative forms

Etymology

Unadapted borrowing from English van.

Pronunciation

 

Noun

van f (plural vans)

  1. (Brazil) van (a covered vehicle used for carrying goods)
    Synonym: furgão

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin vānus, Italian vano.

Pronunciation

Adjective

van m or n (feminine singular vană, masculine plural vani, feminine and neuter plural vane)

  1. vain
  2. futile
  3. idle
  4. fruitless
  5. vainglorious

Declension

Derived terms

Related terms

See also

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *vъnъ.

Pronunciation

Conjunction

vȁn (Cyrillic spelling ва̏н)

  1. except

Preposition

vȁn (Cyrillic spelling ва̏н) (+ genitive case)

  1. outside, out
    van kućeoutside, outdoors
  2. out of
    van zemljeabroad

Adverb

vȃn (Cyrillic spelling ва̑н)

  1. out, outside, outdoors

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈban/
  • Audio (Colombia):(file)
  • Rhymes: -an
  • Syllabification: van

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English van.

Noun

van m (plural vanes)

  1. van (vehicle)

Etymology 2

From Latin vadunt, third-person plural present indicative of vadō (to go).

Verb

van

  1. third-person plural present indicative of ir

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse vanr, from Proto-Germanic *wanaz, from Proto-Indo-European *wāno-.

Pronunciation

Adjective

van (comparative vanare, superlative vanast)

  1. accustomed to, used to, having the habit to
    Han är van vid att stiga upp klockan sju varje morgon.
    He is used to getting up at seven every morning.
  2. experienced, adept
    Hon är en van bilförare.
    She is an experienced driver.

Declension

Inflection of van
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular van vanare vanast
Neuter singular vant vanare vanast
Plural vana vanare vanast
Masculine plural3 vane vanare vanast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 vane vanare vanaste
All vana vanare vanaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic

Antonyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Anagrams

Tagalog

Etymology

Unadapted borrowing from English van, short for caravan..

Pronunciation

Noun

van (Baybayin spelling ᜊᜈ᜔)

  1. van (covered vehicle)

Further reading

  • van”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018

Vietnamese

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

Verb

van (𠹚, )

  1. to beg, to implore
Derived terms
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Borrowed from French valve.

Noun

(classifier cái) van

  1. valve

Etymology 3

Borrowed from French valse.

Noun

van

  1. waltz
Synonyms

Usage notes

Southern speakers pronounce the loanwords meaning "valve" and "waltz" with the phoneme /n/, not /ŋ/.

Yola

Adverb

van

  1. Alternative form of fan
    • 1927, “ZONG OF TWI MAARKEET MOANS”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, page 129, line 10:
      Van a vierd durst a bargher an a haar galshied too,
      When a weasel crossed the road, and a hare gazed at me too,

References

  • Kathleen A. Browne (1927) The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland Sixth Series, Vol.17 No.2, Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, page 129

Zou

Noun

van

  1. heaven, sky

References

  • Lukram Himmat Singh (2013) A Descriptive Grammar of Zou, Canchipur: Manipur University, page 46