yonder

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English

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Middle English yonder, yondre, ȝondre, ȝendre, from Old English ġeonre (thither; yonder, adverb), equivalent to yond (from ġeond, from Proto-Germanic *jainaz) + -er, as in hither, thither.
Cognate with Scots ȝondir (yonder), Saterland Frisian tjunder (over there, yonder), Dutch ginder (over there; yonder), Middle Low German ginder, gender (over there), German jenseits (on the other side, beyond), Gothic 𐌾𐌰𐌹𐌽𐌳𐍂𐌴 (jaindrē, thither).

Pronunciation

Adverb

yonder (not comparable)

  1. (archaic or dialect) At or in a distant but indicated place.
    Whose doublewide is that over yonder?
  2. (archaic or dialect) Synonym of thither: to a distant but indicated place.
    They headed on over yonder.

Synonyms

Derived terms

Translations

Adjective

yonder (comparative more yonder, superlative most yonder)

  1. (archaic or dialect) The farther, the more distant of two choices.

Synonyms

Determiner

yonder

  1. (archaic or dialect, as an adjective) Who or which is over yonder, usually distant but within sight.
    Yonder lass, who be she?
  2. (archaic or dialect, as a pronoun) One who or which is over yonder, usually distant but within sight.
    The yonder is Queen Niobe.

Synonyms

  • (distant but within sight): yon

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

yonder (plural yonders)

  1. (literary) The vast distance, particularly the sky or trackless forest.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

References

  1. ^ https://www.dwds.de/wb/dwb/jener
  2. ^ yonder, adv., adj., pron., & n.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1921.
  3. ^ Stanley, Oma (1937) “I. Vowel Sounds in Stressed Syllables”, in The Speech of East Texas (American Speech: Reprints and Monographs; 2), New York: Columbia University Press, →DOI, →ISBN, § 7, page 18.
  4. ^ Bingham, Caleb (1808) “Improprieties in Pronunciation, common among the people of New-England”, in The Child's Companion; Being a Conciſe Spelling-book , 12th edition, Boston: Manning & Loring, →OCLC, page 77.

Anagrams