adder

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See also: Adder and ADDer

English

The head of the common European adder (Vipera berus)
The sea stickleback or adder-fish (Spinachia spinachia)

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English nadder, addere, rebracketing of “a naddere” as “an addere”, from Old English nǣdre (snake), from Proto-West Germanic *nadrā, from Proto-Germanic *nadrǭ, from pre-Germanic *néh₁treh₂, variant of Proto-Indo-European *n̥h₁trih₂, from *(s)neh₁- (to spin, twist)

See also West Frisian njirre, Dutch adder, German Natter, Otter; also Welsh neidr, Latin natrīx (watersnake), Dutch naaien.

Alternative forms

Noun

adder (plural adders)

  1. (obsolete) Any snake.
    • 1610–1611 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies  (First Folio), London: Isaac Iaggard, and Ed Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, :
      CALIBAN: His spirits hear me, / And yet I needs must curse. But they'll nor pinch / Fright me with urchin-shows, pitch me i'th' mire, / Nor lead me like a firebrand in the dark / Out of my way, unless he bid 'em; but / For every trifle are they set upon me, / Sometimes like apes that mow and chatter at me, / And after bite me; then like hedgehogs, which / Lie tumbling in my barefoot way, and mount / Their pricks at my footfall; sometimes am I / All wound with adders, who with their cloven tongues / Do hiss me into madness—
  2. A name loosely applied to various snakes more or less resembling the viper.
    1. (chiefly British) A small venomous serpent of the genus Vipera
      • 1834, L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], chapter XXX, in Francesca Carrara. , volume III, London: Richard Bentley, , (successor to Henry Colburn), →OCLC, page 245:
        Entirely filled with the image of another, her heart, indeed, had the deaf ear of the adder, which heedeth not the voice of the charmer, charm he never so wisely.
      • 2021 August 25, Nick Brodrick, “Flourishing Flora and Fauna”, in RAIL, number 938, page 51:
        These include the county's [Cumbria's] only venomous snake - the adder - which relies on exposed elements to successfully breed its young.
      1. The common European adder (Vipera berus).
    2. The puff adders, of Africa (genus Bitis).
    3. (US, Canada) Any of several small nonvenomous snakes resembling adders
      1. Lampropeltis triangulum (milk snake).
      2. Heterodon spp. (hog-nosed snakes), a genus of harmless colubrid snakes found in North America
    4. Certain venomous snakes resembling other adders
      1. Acanthophis spp. (death adders), elapid snakes found in Southeast Asia and Australia
      2. Agkistrodon contortrix mokasen, the northern copperhead, a venomous viper found in the eastern United States
    5. A sea stickleback or adder fish (Spinachia spinachia).
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From add +‎ -er.

Noun

adder (plural adders)

  1. Someone who or something which performs arithmetic addition; a machine for adding numbers.
  2. An electronic device that adds voltages, currents or frequencies.
  3. Something which adds or increases.
    They sought out cost adders with an eye toward eliminating them.
Derived terms
Translations

Further reading

Anagrams

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch adder, from Middle Dutch adder, adre, misdivison of nadder, nadre, from Old Dutch *nadra, from Proto-Germanic *nadrǭ.

Pronunciation

Noun

adder (plural adders, diminutive addertjie)

  1. viper, adder

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch adder, adre, rebracketing of nadder, nadre, from Old Dutch *nadra, from Proto-West Germanic *nadrā.

Pronunciation

Noun

adder m or f (plural adders or adderen, diminutive addertje n)

  1. viper, adder; snake of the family Viperidae
  2. common viper, Vipera berus

Hypernyms

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: adder
  • Negerhollands: adder

Anagrams

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

adder

  1. imperative of addere

Old Prussian

Etymology

Borrowed from Early German adder, dialectal variant of oder (or).

Conjunction

adder

  1. or
  2. but, however
    • 1561, Martin Luther, translated by Abel Will & Paul Megott, Stas Likuts Catechismus [The Small Catechism], →OCLC, page 61, line 11:
      Kas ſtwi druwē bhe Crixtits
      wijrſt / ſtas wijrſt Deiwuts / kas adder ni Druwe /
      ſtas wijrſt perklantīts.
      That, who believes and is baptized, shall be blessed; that, however, who doesn't believe, shall be damned.
  3. only, but

References

  • Mažiulis, Vytautas (1988) “adder”, in Prūsų kalbos etimologijos žodynas [Etymological dictionary of Old Prussian]‎ (in Lithuanian), volume 1, Vilnius: Mokslas, page 48