egg

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See also: Egg and EGG

English

Pronunciation

A crocodile hatching from an egg (noun sense 1.1).
Chicken eggs (noun sense 1.1.1) in a nest.
A chicken egg (noun sense 1.1.1) being fried as food.
An Easter egg (sense 1.1.2) made of chocolate with a caramel filling.
A human egg (noun sense 1.2) or ovum being used for in vitro fertilization.
A child with an egg (noun sense 2.1) on the forehead caused by a bump to the head.
Egg (noun sense 2.2) and dart moulding on a fragment from the ruin of the stadium in the ancient Greek city of Perga, now in Antalya, Turkey.

Etymology 1

The noun is derived from Middle English eg, egg, egge (egg of a domestic or wild fowl; egg of a snake) (originally Northern England and Northeast Midlands), from Old Norse egg (egg), from Proto-Germanic *ajją (egg) (by Holtzmann’s law), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm (egg), probably from *h₂éwis (bird), from *h₂ew- (to clothe oneself, dress; to be dressed) (in the sense of an animal clothed in feathers). Doublet of ovum.

The native English ey (plural eyren) (obsolete), from Old English ǣġ, is also derived from Proto-Germanic *ajją. It survived into the 16th century before being fully displaced by egg.

The verb is derived from the noun.

Noun

egg (countable and uncountable, plural eggs)

  1. (countable, zoology)
    1. An approximately spherical or ellipsoidal body produced by birds, insects, reptiles, and other animals, housing the embryo within a membrane or shell during its development.
      • 1535 October 14 (Gregorian calendar), Myles Coverdale, transl., Biblia: The Byble,  (Coverdale Bible), , OCLC 79441532, Job xxxix:, folio xi, recto, column 2:
        The Eſtrich (whoſe fethers are fayrer thẽ ye wynges of the ſparow hauke) whẽ he hath layd his egges vpon the grounde, he bredeth them in the duſt, and forgetteth them: ſo that they might be troden with feete, or broken with ſomme wilde beaſt.
      • 1599 (first performance), William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Iulius Cæsar”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies  (First Folio), London: Isaac Iaggard, and Ed Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, , page 114, column 1:
        hinke him as a Serpents egge, / VVhich hatch'd, vvould as his kinde grovv mischieuous; / And kill him in the ſhell.
      • 1657, Samuel Purchas, “Of the Generation of Bees”, in A Theatre of Politicall Flying-Insects. , London: R. I. for Thomas Parkhurst, , OCLC 5952968, pages 47–48:
        An egg properly is that, out of a part vvhereof a living creature is produced, and the reſidue is meat for it, improperly that is an egg out of the vvhole vvhereof, a living creature is bred, as the eggs of Spiders, Ants, Flies.
      • 1791, Oliver Goldsmith, “Of Quadrupeds in General, Compared to Man”, in An History of the Earth, and Animated Nature. , volume II, new edition, London: F Wingrave, successor to Mr. Nourse, , OCLC 877622212, pages 311–312:
        here is one claſs of quadrupeds that ſeems entirely left to chance, Theſe are the quadrupeds that are brought forth from the egg, ſuch as the lizard, the tortoiſe, and the crocodile. he numerous brood of eggs are, vvithout farther ſolicitude, buried in the vvarm ſands of the ſhore, and the heat of the ſun alone is left to bring them to perfection.
      • 1847, William Harvey, “Anatomical Exercises on the Generation of Animals; to which are Added, Essays on Parturition; on the Membranes, and Fluids of the Uterus; and on Conception. ”, in Robert Willis, transl., The Works of William Harvey, M.D., London: Sydenham Society, OCLC 989082750, page 264:
        The egg is, as we have said, a kind of exposed uterus, and place in which the embryo is fashioned: for it performs the office of the uterus and enfolds the chick until the due time of its exclusion arrive, when the creature is born perfect.
        A translation of a passage from Harvey’s Exercitationes de generatione animalium (1651).
      1. (specifically, countable) The edible egg (sense 1.1) of a domestic fowl such as a duck, goose, or, especially, a chicken; (uncountable) the contents of such an egg or eggs used as food.
        Synonym: (humorous, or in French cooking) oeuf
        We made a big omelette with three eggs. (countable)
        I should determine the minimal amount of egg required to make good mayonnaise. (uncountable)
        The farmer offered me some fresh eggs, but I told him I was allergic to egg. (countable, uncountable)
      2. (by extension, countable) A food item shaped to resemble an egg (sense 1.1.1), such as a chocolate egg.
    2. (also cytology) Synonym of ovum (the female gamete of an animal); an egg cell.
      • 1981, William Irwin Thompson, “Hominization”, in The Time Falling Bodies Take to Light: Mythology, Sexuality and the Origins of Culture (A Lindisfarne Series Book), New York, N.Y.: St. Martin’s Press, →ISBN, part 2 (The Transformations of Prehistory), page 80:
        In the Fall into the division of labor, Lévi-Strauss sees the great hunters trading women to create the exogamous bonds of one hunting band with another. The egg is, but the sperm does. The tiny sperm may be furious in its activity, but its highway to the egg is paved by the alkaline trail set down by the Great Mother.
      • 2013 May-June, Katrina G. Claw, “Rapid Evolution in Eggs and Sperm”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, New Haven, Conn.: Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society, DOI:10.1511/2013.102.210, ISSN 0003-0996, OCLC 891112584, archived from the original on 22 April 2013, abstract, page 210:
        Although they serve the same function across the plant, animal and fungal kingdoms, sperm and eggs vary wildly in their structure and biochemistry, even among closely related species. Many genes that determine sperm and egg structure and biochemistry are rapidly evolving, constantly changing the chemical environment necessary for the sperm to bind to the egg.
  2. (countable) A thing which looks like or is shaped like an egg (sense 1.1).
    • 1621 August 13 (first performance; Gregorian calendar), Ben Jonson, “The Masque of the Gypsies”, in Q. Horatius Flaccus: His Art of Poetry. , London: J Okes, for John Benson , published 1640, OCLC 1203251361, page 84:
      His ſtomacke vvas queaſie (for comming there Coacht) / The jogging had caus’d ſome crudities riſe; / To help it he call’d for a Puritan poacht, / That uſed to turne up the egg’s of his eyes.
      Referring to the whites of the eyes.
    • 1659 December 30 (date written), Robert Boyle, “”, in New Experiments Physico-Mechanicall, Touching the Spring of the Air, and Its Effects, (Made, for the Most Part, in a New Pneumatical Engine) , Oxford, Oxfordshire: H Hall, printer to the University, for Tho Robinson, published 1660, OCLC 633153238, page 144:
      There vvas taken a great Glaſs-bubble, vvith a long neck; (ſuch as Chymiſts are vvont to call a Philoſophical Egg) vvhich being fill'd vvith common VVater till the Liquor reach'd about a ſpan above the bubble, and a piece of Paper being there paſted on, vvas put unſtop'd into the Receiver,
    1. A swelling on one's head, usually large or noticeable, resulting from an injury.
      Synonym: (Canada, US, informal) goose egg
    2. (architecture) Chiefly in egg and dart: an ornamental oval moulding alternating in a row with dart or triangular shapes.
    3. (chiefly sports) A score of zero; specifically (cricket), a batter's failure to score; a duck egg or duck's egg.
      Synonyms: (Canada, US, informal) goose egg, (billiards, racquet sports (especially tennis)) love
    4. (military, dated) A bomb or mine.
  3. (countable, figuratively)
    1. Senses relating to people.
      1. (informal, dated) A person; a fellow.
        a bad egg    a good egg    a tough egg    Cheerio, old egg!
      2. (derogatory, ethnic slur, rare) A white person considered to be overly infatuated with East Asia.
        Hypernym: race traitor
        Hyponyms: Koreaboo, wapanese, weeaboo, weeb, wumao
      3. (Internet slang, derogatory, dated) A user of the microblogging service Twitter identified by the default avatar (historically an image of an egg (sense 1.1.1)) rather than a custom image; hence, a newbie or noob.
      4. (transgender slang) A person regarded as having not yet realized they are transgender, who has not yet come out as transgender, or who is in the early stages of transitioning; also, one's lack of awareness that one is transgender.
        to crack someone’s egg (to cause someone to realize they are transgender)
        • 2018, Casey Plett, Susan Safyan, editor, Little Fish, Vancouver, B.C.: Arsenal Pulp Press, →ISBN, page 24:
          That fits, though, she thought. Wear the same outfit day after day, your brain gets numb to how it looks or feels—Wendy shut the album. No. She hated analyzing the whys of trans girls. She had always hated it, and she hated how easy it had become; the bottomless hole of egg mode.
      5. (New Zealand, derogatory) A foolish or obnoxious person.
        Shut up, you egg!
      6. (derogatory, obsolete) A young person.
    2. (archaic) Something regarded as containing a (usually bad) thing at an early stage.
      • a. 1658 (date written), George Daniel, “Trinarchodia. The Raigne of Henry the Fourth.”, in Alexander B Grosart, editor, The Poems of George Daniel, Esq. of Beswick, Yorkshire. (1616–1657) from the Original MSS. in the British Museum: Hitherto Unprinted. , volume IV, for private circulation only, published 1878, OCLC 558894212, stanza 348, page 88:
        oe Power of Warre / From the firſt Egge of Libertie, out-Creepes / A fatall Serpent;
      • 1683 June 5 (Gregorian calendar), Roger L’Estrange, “The State of the City of London, in the Late Rebellion. ”, in The Observator, in Dialogue, volume I, number 345, London: J. Bennet, for William Abington, , OCLC 642997431, page , column 1:
        In ſhort, the Rebellion had been Cruſh'd in the Egg; and One Seaſonable Act of Rigour, had Sav'd the King, the Monarchy, the Church, and the Three Kingdoms.
    3. (computing) One of the blocks of data injected into a program's address space for use by certain forms of shellcode, such as "omelettes".
      • 2015, Charles Smutz; Angelos Stavrou, “Preventing Exploits in Microsoft Office Documents through Content Randomization”, in Herbert Bos, Fabian Monrose, and Gregory Blanc, editors, Research in Attacks, Intrusions, and Defenses: 18th International Symposium, RAID 2015, Kyoto, Japan, November 2–4, 2015: Proceedings (LNCS; 9404; Sublibrary SL4 (Security and Cryptology)), Cham, Switzerland; Heidelberg, Baden-Württemburg: Springer International Publishing, DOI:10.1007/978-3-319-26362-5, →ISBN, ISSN 0302-9743, page 241:
        This approach would be altered for an optimal omelette based exploit. One would spray the heap with the omelette code solely, then load a single copy of the additional shellcode eggs into memory outside the target region for the spray.
Usage notes

When the word is used in sense 1.1.1 (“edible egg”) without any qualifying word, it refers to a chicken’s egg.

The use as in 3.1.4 can be sensitive, as regards people who have yet to openly identify as transgender (and possibly even to consider themselves such).

Alternative forms
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Jamaican Creole: eg
  • Sranan Tongo: eksi
Translations
See also

Verb

egg (third-person singular simple present eggs, present participle egging, simple past and past participle egged)

  1. (transitive)
    1. To throw (especially rotten) eggs (noun sense 1.1.1) at (someone or something).
      The angry demonstrators egged the riot police.
      The students were caught egging the principal’s car as a prank.
      • 2013 February, M. Golding, “Framing”, in How to Piss Off a Crappy Roommate: From A to Z, : Lulu, →ISBN, page 89:
        Like I said before in that chapter, after that ultimate egging, Gay-D didn't mention anything about eggs again, but he meekly ask for us to stop egging Xander's door so that he wouldn't get blamed.
    2. To inadvertently or intentionally distort (the circular cross-section of something, such as tube) to an elliptical or oval shape.
      After I cut the tubing, I found that I had slightly egged it in the vise.
    3. (cooking) To coat (a food ingredient) with or dip (a food ingredient) in beaten egg (noun sense 1.1.1) during the process of preparing a dish.
      • , chapter I, in Peter Simple. , volume I, London: Saunders and Otley, , published 1834, OCLC 27694940, page 8:
        "Jemima, Jemima!—ve'll ha'e the viting biled instead of fried." "Ca'n't, marm," replied Jemima, "they be all hegged and crumbed, with their tails in their mouths."]
      • 1834, MA Carême, John Porter, editor, The Royal Parisian Pastrycook and Confectioner: , London: F. J. Mason, , OCLC 15160719, page 163:
        Then mask another large piece with currant jelly, cover it as before, and after egging the edges, roll them over some coarse sugar, and put them immediately in the oven. Join the remaining pieces in the same manner, two and two, and after egging the edges as before, roll them alternately on pistachios and coarse sugar.
  2. (intransitive) To collect the eggs (noun sense 1.1) of wild birds.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English eggen (to urge on; to entice, incite, lure, tempt; to encourage, exhort, stimulate; (reflexive) to bestir (oneself); to challenge, taunt; to enrage, irritate), from Old Norse eggja (to incite, egg on), from egg (an edge), from Proto-Germanic *agjō (a corner; an edge), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp).

Verb

egg (third-person singular simple present eggs, present participle egging, simple past and past participle egged)

  1. (transitive, obsolete except in egg on) To encourage, incite, or urge (someone).
    Synonyms: (obsolete) edge, provoke, tempt
    • 1571, Arthur Golding, “To the Right Honorable and His Verie Good Lord Edward de Vere Erle of Oxinford, ”, in John Calvin; Arthur Golding, transl., The Psalmes of Dauid and Others. VVith M. Iohn Caluin’s Commentaries, London: Thomas East and Henry Middelton; for Lucas Harison, and Gorge Byshop, OCLC 1121348373, 1st part, folio iiij, recto:
      it haue vvee one thing in our ſelues and of our ſelues, (euen originall ſinne, concupiſcence or luſt) vvhich neuer ceaſeth too egge vs and allure vs from God, and too ſtaine vs vvith all kinde of vnclennes:
    • 1586, William Warner, “The Fourth Booke. Chapter XX.”, in Albions England. A Continued Historie of the Same Kingdome, from the Originals of the First Inhabitants thereof: , 5th edition, London: Edm Bollifant for George Potter, , published 1602, OCLC 1179445035, page 96:
      The Neatreſſe, longing for the reſt, / Did egge him on to tell / How faire ſhe vvas, and vvho ſhe vvas.
    • 1603, Matthew Kellison, “The First Chapter Sheweth How the Reformers Take Away Hope of Heauen and Feare of Hell, and Consequently Open the Gapp to All Vice”, in A Survey of the New Religion, Detecting Manie Grosse Absurdities which it Implieth. , Douai: Lawrence Kellam, , OCLC 220697315, 7th book (Conteineth a Suruey of the New Doctrine Concerning Manners, ), page 510:
      Hope like a ſpurre pricketh forvvard, feare like a bridle reſtraineth, hope eggeth onvvard vnto vertue, feare pulleth backe from vice, hope incites vs to obſerue the lavv, feare makes vs feare to trãſgreſſe the lavve.
    • 1610 October, John Foxe, Actes and Monuments of Matters Most Speciall and Memorable, Happening in the Church, with an Vniuersall Historie of the Same. , volume I, 6th edition, London: for the Company of Stationers, OCLC 81611923, book IV, page 299, column 1:
      Thus time paſſing on, within a yeere following, which was in the yeere of our Lord 1261. the king [Henry III of England] ſeeing himſelfe more and more to grow in debt, and not to bee relieued according to promiſe made, but eſpecially being egged (as may be thought) by his brethren taking it to ſtomach, ſent vp to the pope, both for him and his ſonne Edward to bee releaſed of their oth made before at Oxford.
    • 1633, Levine Lemnie , “Of the Spirit Universall Generally Inspired into the Whole World, and All the Parts thereof. ”, in T N, transl., The Touchstone of Complexions. , London: E A for Michael Sparke, , OCLC 84753954, pages 34–35:
      And of them they make tvvo ſorts, the good Angels, and the bad: becauſe the good pricketh a man forvvard, to grace, goodneſſe, vertue, and honeſty: the other eggeth him to levvdneſſe, miſchiefe, ſhame, villany, and all kinde of looſe diſhoneſty.
    • 1758, Maphaeus , [John Ellis], transl., The Canto Added by Maphæus to Virgil’s Twelve Books of Æneas, from the Original Bombastic, Done into English Hudibrastic; With Notes beneath, and Latin Text in Ev’ry Other Page Annext, London: R and J Dodsley , OCLC 642407125, lines 227–230, page 35:
      O harpy Love-rule, murd'rous Hag; / Whither doſt thou blind Mortals drag! / 'Tis thou to Battle eggeſt Kings / As well as Louts to Wreſtling-rings;
    • 1877, William Morris, “Regin Telleth Sigurd of His Kindred, and of the Gold that was Accursed from Ancient Days”, in The Story of Sigurd the Volsung and the Fall of the Niblungs, London: Ellis and White, , OCLC 9586253, book II (Regin), page 93:
      Nought such do I look to be. / But thou, a deedless man, too much thou eggest me:
    • 1883, “Bersaoglis Vísor, c. 1039. (From the Lives of Kings, especially Kringla, Hulda, Flatey-bok iii. 267–269.)”, in Gudbrand Vigfusson and F York Powell, editors, Corpvs Poeticvm Boreale: The Poetry of the Old Northern Tongue: From the Earliest Times to the Thirteenth Century , volume II (Court Poetry), Oxford, Oxfordshire: Clarendon Press, OCLC 1051499663, book VIII (Christian Court Poetry), § 2 (St. Olaf and Cnut), page 147:
      Who is egging thee, king, to go back from the oath thou hast sworn? A worthy king of men should be true to his word. It can never beseem thee, my lord, to break thine oath. Who is egging thee, prince, to slaughter the cattle of thy thanes? It is tyranny for a king to do such deed in his own land.
Conjugation
Derived terms
Translations

References

  1. ^ eg(ge, n.(1)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ egg, n.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, September 2022; “egg1, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.
  3. ^ ei, n.(1)}”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  4. ^ egg, v.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2022.
  5. ^ eggen, v.(1)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  6. ^ egg, v.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2022; “egg2, v.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.

Further reading

Anagrams


Faroese

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm.

Noun

egg n (genitive singular egs, plural egg)

  1. egg
Declension
n23 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative egg eggið egg eggini
Accusative egg eggið egg eggini
Dative eggi egginum egg(j)um egg(j)unum
Genitive egs egsins eggja eggjanna
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From the Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *agjō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp, pointed).

Noun

egg f (genitive singular eggjar, plural eggjar)

  1. blade, edge
  2. border, edge of a cliff
Declension
f8 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative egg eggin eggjar eggjarnar
Accusative egg eggina eggjar eggjarnar
Dative egg eggini eggjum eggjunum
Genitive eggjar eggjarinnar eggja eggjanna

German

Pronunciation

Verb

egg

  1. singular imperative of eggen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of eggen

Icelandic

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm. Cognate with Old English ǣġ (obsolete English ey); Swedish ägg; Old High German ei (German Ei).

Noun

egg n (genitive singular eggs, nominative plural egg)

  1. (zoology) an egg
  2. an oval shaped object
  3. the ovum
Declension
Synonyms
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *agjō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp, pointed).

Cognates include Old Frisian egg, Old Saxon eggia, Dutch egge; Old English ecg (English edge); Old High German egga (German Ecke); Swedish egg.

The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin aciēs (edge, sharpness), Ancient Greek ἀκίς (akís, point).

Noun

egg f (genitive singular eggjar, nominative plural eggjar)

  1. (weaponry) the sharp edge of a knife, sword, or similar
  2. a sharp edge on a mountain
Declension
Synonyms
Derived terms

Middle English

Noun

egg

  1. Alternative form of eg (egg)

Norwegian Bokmål

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Norse egg n (egg), from Proto-Germanic *ajją (egg), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm (egg), likely from *h₂éwis (bird), possibly from *h₂ew- (to enjoy, consume).

Cognate with English egg (egg), Icelandic egg (egg), Faroese egg (egg), Swedish ägg (egg), Danish æg (egg).

Noun

egg n (definite singular egget, indefinite plural egg, definite plural egga or eggene)

  1. an egg
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse egg f.

Noun

egg f or m (definite singular egga or eggen, indefinite plural egger, definite plural eggene)

  1. (cutting) edge (e.g. of a knife)
Derived terms

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Norse egg n, from Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm. Akin to English egg.

Noun

egg n (definite singular egget, indefinite plural egg, definite plural egga)

  1. an egg
Inflection
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse egg f, from Proto-Germanic *agjō f (edge, corner), and ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European root *h₂eḱ-. Cognates include English edge and German Ecke.

Noun

egg f or m (definite singular eggen or egga, indefinite plural eggar or egger, definite plural eggane or eggene)

  1. an edge (the thin cutting side of the blade of an instrument, such as an ax, knife, sword, or scythe)
  2. (geology) an arête
Inflection

References


Old Norse

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm.

Noun

egg n (genitive eggs, plural egg)

  1. egg
Declension
Descendants

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *agjō. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp).

Noun

egg f (genitive eggjar, plural eggjar)

  1. edge (of a blade)
Declension
Descendants
  • Icelandic: egg
  • Faroese: egg
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: egg
  • Dalian: egg
  • Westrobothnian: aigg
  • Old Swedish: eg
  • Danish: æg
    • Norwegian Bokmål: egg

References

  • Zoëga, Geir T. (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *agjō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp, pointed).

Pronunciation

Noun

egg c

  1. The sharp edge of a cutting tool.

Declension

Declension of egg 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative egg eggen eggar eggarna
Genitive eggs eggens eggars eggarnas

Related terms

References


Westrobothnian

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *ajją. Compare with Swedish ägg.

Noun

egg n (definite singular eggj’eð, defininte plural egg’a)

  1. Egg.

Etymology 2

From Old Norse egg from Proto-Germanic *agjō.

Pronunciation

Noun

egg n (definite singular eggj’eð, defininte plural egg’a)

  1. The sharp edge of a cutting tool.
Derived terms

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Lindgren, J. V., 1940, “'*agg etc.”, in Orbok över Burträskmålet, page 36 and 163
  • Marklund, Thorsten, 1986, Skelleftemålet: grammatik och ordlista : för lekmän - av lekman , →ISBN, page 72